Life

How Budget Jewelry Could Be Messing with Your Health

The problems with cadmium and how you can avoid this cheap filler metal

We've all heard of platinum, gold, and silver used for jewelry, right? Well, how about cadmium? We hate to break it to you, but this is definitely a metal that you'll want to hear more about, but not so you can be ahead of the next jewelry trend. Just the opposite actually. As a pretty cheap metal, it is often either added into jewelry pieces as filler or even used entirely to make pieces of jewelry. This hitchhiker makes jewelry more affordable, but really, shouldn't be used at all! Cadmium has got some pretty yucky health effects, but luckily with some savvy shopping knowledge, you'll be able to avoid this metal and any of its health harms.

What's the deal with cadmium showing up in jewelry?

Cadmium has some awesome properties as a metal. When it is added to other metals that are frequently used for jewelry (making it what is known as a metal alloy), it can increase the strength and durability of a piece of jewelry so it doesn't break as easily from the wear and tear of everyday life (2). Not to mention, cadmium is extremely cheap as far as metals go, and easy for industries to get their hands on (4). Because of this, cadmium is often found in children's jewelry, since using more expensive metals often makes the piece of children's jewelry a sky-high price (totally annoying for something that might get lost or forgotten after a couple rounds of play, right?) (2).

This isn't to say that it can't be found in adult jewelry. Cadmium has been found in jewelry from Ross, Nordstrom Rack and Papaya, in addition to Claire's and Limited Too (2,3). With so many great things about cadmium, it must have downside right? If you guessed yes, you're right, it does.

What should I be worried about?

In a nutshell, cadmium is not good for you! Even with very small amounts it can cause some pretty concerning health effects (1). Some health effects that scientists know for sure that are caused by cadmium are kidney, bone and lung damage (1). If you're exposed to cadmium for a long time (i.e. you've been wearing the same necklace for 10 years), it can cause cancer and harm to your reproductive system (2,4). Recently, there has been new research coming out that suggests that exposure to cadmium might even have some endocrine-disrupting effects (a.k.a. messing up the way your hormones are supposed to work in your body) (1).

If we know it's dangerous, why is it used in jewelry at all? Well, the problem is that since most states don't have regulations on cadmium usage in jewelry (with the exception of California, Connecticut, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, and Washington, although it seems like there is little to no enforcement), we don't know which pieces of jewelry contain cadmium and which ones don't. The Center for Environmental Health found that in the pieces they tested from Ross, Nordstrom Rack, and the other stores mentioned above, many of the pieces were over 90 percent cadmium (2), so there's no way of knowing what you're getting!

How can we be exposed?

Since the negative health effects of cadmium generally requires chronic exposure, wearing jewelry is really a perfect route for exposure, since many people wear some sort of jewelry piece every day (2). Children are exposed to cadmium when they suck, chew, or even swallow jewelry (2). Another concern is that some will be absorbed through the skin. But by far, the biggest worry is for children, who might accidentally swallow small bits of cadmium when wearing or playing with jewelry (3). This is especially problematic since children absorb cadmium more easily than adults, and their organs are also smaller, meaning the organs get more easily overwhelmed by the amount of cadmium than compared to adult organs (1). For adults, the concern is mainly over dermal exposure, since they are way less likely to gnaw on a necklace (3).

If we can't tell what's in our jewelry, how can we stay away from cadmium?

There is not really a fool-proof method, but scientists recommend not purchasing jewelry that is cheap (3). Most likely, these pieces have cadmium added in order to lower the price point (3). What does this mean for you?

  • Think quality over quantity. We recommend investing in pieces that are more versatile and can be worn with multiple outfits. And hey, added bonus, you're doing the earth a favor too, by being more sustainable!
  • For children, look into alternatives to metal jewelry. Wooden or silicone beads and twine make for an excellent art day, and ensure that children have a beautiful necklace or bracelet to wear that doesn't contain cadmium. They will also be pretty excited when they get to say they made their own jewelry.
  • If you're worried about a piece of jewelry you have, The Center for Environmental Health can test pieces for you. They offer free testing of items for lead and cadmium by appointment or mail-in.

Hey, jewelry making companies might be trying to keep their prices down by using cadmium, but now you're all set to make safer and more informed decisions the next time you go jewelry shopping!

References

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3002210/
  2. https://www.ceh.org/campaigns/legal-action/previous-work/fashion-accessories/cadmium-in-jewelry/
  3. https://nypost.com/2018/10/11/jewelry-with-toxic-chemicals-found-on-retail-shelves/
https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp.asp?id=48&tid=15

Making Your Fruits and Veggies Last

In times of pantry cooking and beyond

In this unprecedented time of social distancing and stay-at-home orders, we're all eating a little bit differently. It can be tough to get to the grocery store and favorite items might be sold out. Our usual restaurant stops, home deliveries, and takeout options may not be available. While we're cooking more with less, it's more important than ever to make your fresh fruits and vegetables last. Luckily, the kitchen ideas I've learned over the past few years for fighting food waste are easily transferable to cooking in a time of quarantine. When you're aiming to make your food go far, during a pandemic or just real life, it's good to know how to make your fresh produce last as long as possible.

A good principle is to store your produce in the same areas as they do in the supermarket. It's their literal business to keep food fresh as long as possible! While you obviously won't be using the exact same methods - they're aiming for display as well as storage - you can think of your produce in the same fundamental categories:

  1. Room Temperature Storage: these are the items you'd find displayed out of refrigeration in the produce section and can be divided into:
    1. Pantry storage (cooler and away from the light) for sturdy and long-lasting vegetables
    2. Counter storage for fruits that need to ripen
  2. Refrigeration: These are the fresh fruits and vegetables in the refrigerated cases of the produce department and typically fall into three categories:
    1. Loose: most fruit, like citrus and melons can just be placed into your fridge drawers
    2. Airtight storage: most delicate greens
    3. Breathable storage: berries and most other vegetables, from roots to stalks to hearty greens
  3. Special storage: a few items, like asparagus, mushrooms, corn and fresh herbs require a bit more attention.


Let's dive a bit more deeply into each one:

Room Temperature Storage:

Pantry Storage: some vegetables need a cool, dark place for optimum storage. In the old days that would have been a root cellar, but let's be honest - who has a root cellar these days? For most people this means a cupboard or a drawer away from the light where you'll store the following items:

  • Tubers such as potatoes and sweet potatoes, winter squash, and even eggplant, which browns in the fridge.
  • Onions, shallots, and similar alliums should also be stored somewhere cool and dark, but not with potatoes. If stored together, they'll cause the potatoes to sprout. While we're on the topic - green and sprouted potatoes can be eaten if peeled deeply to remove all green and sprouty bits, but if you're immunocompromised in any way, just compost them.

Counter Storage: your counter is the best place for most fruits (except apples, citrus and berries) to sit until ripe - that's why fruit bowls exist! Once ripe, these fruits should be moved to the refrigerator to preserve them as long as possible. Melons, stone fruit (i.e. peaches, nectarines, cherries, etc), and bananas fit into this category, as do avocados. Tomatoes should ideally always be kept at room temperature, but can be moved to the fridge once cut, or if in desperation to keep them a bit longer. If your tomatoes get wrinkly, roast them up!

Refrigerator Storage:

Produce in the fridge fits into three categories: loose, airtight or breathable. You'll see a lot of storage guides recommend plastic bags for airtight or breathable storage, but there are other options if you're trying to minimize your use of plastic. You can invest in reusable storage bags or save the plastic ones that come into your house as bread storage or cereal bags. Try repurposing old storage boxes or tupperware for fridge storage. A lot of items will do well in their original plastic container, such as berries and grapes, which can then be recycled.

Fruits in the fridge:

  • Apples, citrus and berries don't need time to ripen, and so should be refrigerated right away if you're aiming for lengthy storage. Take them out or let them sit at room temperature if you know you're going to eat them soon.
  • Berries do well staying in their original box or another breathable container. Once you get them home, remove any moldy ones, then don't wash them until you're ready to eat.
  • Citrus can last a long time in the fridge, loose in your crisper drawer.
  • Any other fruit that has been stored on the counter to ripen can be moved to the fridge to hold, or should be stored in the fridge in an airtight container once cut

Vegetables in the fridge: Most vegetables do best in the fridge when uncut, unwashed, and wrapped in a breathable container. This could be a plastic bag with holes in it or a reusable bag left open. The goal is to limit oxygen exposure, but allow a bit of airflow to minimize the moisture and condensation that causes rotting. This method works well for roots such as carrots and parsnips, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and Brussels sprouts, fruits that are actually vegetables such as summer squash and cucumbers, as well as fresh beans, green onions and more. If your roots have greens on them like beets or turnips, cut the greens off and store them separately as they'll draw moisture from the root. Don't throw them out though - they're delicious cooked like chard or another sturdy leafy green.

Greens, especially delicate salad leaves, are more susceptible to moisture and wilting. You'll want to limit their supply of oxygen by storing in the airtight original container or rolled up in a plastic or reusable bag. Either way, it helps to stick a paper towel or dish towel in with the greens to soak up any moisture that would cause sliminess.

Special Storage:

There are a few fruits and vegetables out there that need some additional TLC to last as long as possible. Asparagus and most leafy fresh herbs are best stored like cut flowers. Place them in a tall upright container in an inch or two of fresh water and refrigerate. The one exception is basil, which should be kept at room temperature or it'll brown. Corn should be kept in the husk if possible; if not, wrap in damp towels to keep them moist, then wrap in a bag.

While we're on special storage - the most highly controversial of vegetable storage topics is... mushrooms! Some people swear by paper bags or damp cloths to retain some moisture; others claim that any moisture will speed up the rotting process and breathable plastic bags should be used instead. Just for you guys, I did an at-home experiment comparing a breathable cloth bag to an open silicone bag to a paper bag. After 5 days, the mushrooms were all still good, if the tiniest bit slimy, but the least slimy ones were the ones stored in the paper bag. However, the original packaging often works well too.

Freezing Fruits and Veggies:

If you're really aiming for long-term storage, most fruits and vegetables can be frozen. Fruits will lose texture (i.e. you wouldn't want to eat them raw once defrosted) so they're perfect for cooked desserts or smoothies. Vegetables can be frozen raw or cooked, depending on the vegetable, but you'll also want to use them in cooked dishes.

Fruits: cut your fruit into pieces, lay on a tray, then transfer to a resealable bag. Defrost, then use for pie or tarts, or leave frozen for smoothies. Frozen peeled bananas make a delicious ice cream substitute when blended!

Vegetables: hearty greens and other tender vegetables like asparagus and broccoli are best blanched before freezing - chop, boil in salted water for a few minutes, then drain and let cool and freeze in bags. Tomatoes and onions can be frozen when raw or cooked (chop them first), then used in cooked dishes once defrosted. Sturdier vegetables like winter squash and sweet potatoes do best when cooked and pureed, then frozen. Herbs freeze best with a bit of oil in an ice cube tray, then you can toss the cubes into stews, soups, and more. The main vegetables that don't freeze well are potatoes and lettuce. If you must freeze potatoes, make them into mashed potatoes first. And if your lettuce is getting old you can cook it (stir-fry or soup!) or perk it up in an ice water bath.

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Home

Grow Fresh Produce in Your Kitchen Using Food Scraps!

All you need is some water and a sunny window…

Fresh fruits and veggies are tasty, add flavor to any meal, and are an important part of a balanced diet. They can also help boost your immune system, which we're all about right now. But these days we're trying to limit trips to the grocery store as much as possible. So how do you keep a stash of produce available without having to leave your house? By planting food scraps! Yes, you read that correctly.



Growing produce from food scraps has a lot of benefits. It diverts food waste from your trash or compost, it can teach young children about gardening, and it provides a relaxing project during these uncertain times. Plus, as long as you don't use any pesticides, everything you grow in your kitchen will be organic! Below are some types of food scraps that will grow into new produce with minimal effort on your part.

Lemongrass- this citrusy herb is easy to grow and will up the flavor profile of any dish! Put the bottom 2-3 inches of lemongrass in a half inch of water and keep in a sunny window. Change the water every few days. New growth will sprout from the center.

Celery- Put the bottom 2 inches of a celery stalk in a shallow bowl of water and place in a sunny window. Replace the water daily. New growth will appear within a few days. It might take a while for a full stalk to grow, but you can use the small growth to flavor dishes or to make your own celery powder!

Green onion- This is one of the easiest things to grow in your kitchen! Keep the white part of the onion in a small glass of water. Green onions will grow really fast in a sunny spot- you could have fresh onions in about one week!

Lettuce- place the bottom portion of a head of lettuce in a shallow bowl of water in a sunny window (you know the drill by now). New lettuce will start sprouting in a few days and you'll have about ½ of a head of lettuce in two weeks. That's the perfect amount for a sandwich or a burger!

Home

9 Veggies You Can Grow Indoors

Gourmet dinners with fresh veggies and no more plastic herb packets are in your future

What's better than having an indoor plant baby? How about one that gives you food? Since we are all spending more time at home these days and making less trips to the grocery store, it's a perfect time to try your hand at some indoor veggies that you can grow in your windowsill. Plus this is a great project to do with kids if you are homeschooling them due to COVID-19 school closures. Some ideas include helping plant and water the seeds, writing down weekly observations, measuring and drawing the vegetables as they grow, and finally learning to cook with them. Here are our suggestions for 9 veggies and herbs that are easy to grow inside and are useful to have on hand.

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It seems like everyone is staying home these days. Whether it's because of a mandatory order or out of an abundance of precaution, people are staying close to home and limiting travel. Social distancing is incredibly important to stop the spread of COVID-19, but staying at home means we suddenly have a lot more time on our hands. But that doesn't mean we have to be bored! There's still plenty to keep us busy as we shelter in place or practice social distancing. We've thought of some easy, outdoor-oriented activities you can do while on a walk or while getting some fresh air with your kids.

Activities for Adults

  • Do an outdoor guided meditation. These are difficult times and anxiety might be higher than normal. Meditation is proven to help lower stress and anxiety, as is going outdoors. Why not combine the two? There are a lot of free guided meditation online or on Youtube. We recommend going on a short walk, then finding somewhere to sit and meditate. Walking meditations are also a great way to stretch your legs while practicing mindfulness.
  • This is a great time to try a new hobby! Why not take up gardening? Gardening can help lower stress and anxiety, burn calories, and help you get outside more. Plus, you can also grow your own food! A meal just tastes better when the produce comes from your own backyard, right? Before you pick up your trowel, check out our guides on soil, composting, and growing veggies indoors (in case you're an apartment dweller).
  • Take a sketchbook with you on your next walk and sketch five things that make you happy. This could be a beautiful flower, a cute dog, or even just the sunny sky! This is a great way to keep you present during your walk and a way to focus on the positive.

Activities for Kids

  • Take a walk around your neighborhood or visit an open space or park for a hike and bring a pouch to collect natural objects such as flowers, rocks, leaves, sticks, and pinecones. It's a great way to have kids notice what's around them and to appreciate the beauty in what may seem like everyday objects. Then when you get home, have the kids organize the objects into alphabet letters or numbers and glue them to form nature collages. If you have older kids, use these objects to illustrate a scene from a favorite book or to make nature art.
  • We're definitely on board with getting outside for a bit of exercise, but kids sometimes it takes a bit of work to keep kids interested. Another idea for a hike or walk outside is to give your kids a camera (or your phone) and have them take pictures of things that they think are interesting or beautiful. Could be a flower, unusual shaped tree, colorful mailbox, or anything else they see. When you get home, print the pictures and have the kids make a collage. If you have older kids, have them write a story with the collage as an inspiration.
  • Another way to keep an outdoor walk interesting for kids is to bring a notebook and have them draw a map of your walk as you go. Make sure to note landmarks, unique natural features, or streets in your neighborhood. For older kids, this activity can become more challenging by having them note distance, elevation, and cardinal directions.



It seems like everyone is staying home these days. Whether it's because of a mandatory order or out of an abundance of precaution, people are staying close to home and limiting travel. Social distancing is incredibly important to stop the spread of COVID-19, but staying at home means we suddenly have a lot more time on our hands. That's why we compiled a list of our favorite environment-related tv shows and books! Half of the recommendations for kids, so everyone in the household can continue to learn about the environment!

Books

Adults



The Overstory by Richard Powers: Winner of the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction, this novel follows nine characters from drastically different walks of life and highlights their own unique relationship with trees. The Overstory tells a tale of activism, environmentalism, and resilience.


Horizon by Barry Lopez: Travel the globe with Lopez as he observes the natural world around him. With a quiet disposition and keen eye he listens to stories of researchers and locals, piecing together an understanding of human's complex connections to nature.


The Future We Choose: Surviving the Climate Crisis by Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac: Figueres and Rivett-Carnac, who led negotiations for the United Nations during the 2015 Paris Agreement, discusses two scenarios: a world that meets the Paris climate targets, and a world that does not. The Future We Choose discusses how we can all tackle the climate crisis with determination and optimism.

Kids


Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth by Oliver Jeffers, illustrator of the bestseller The Day the Crayons Quit. This is a beautifully illustrated and heart warming book that serves as a tour through the Earth. With curiosity inducing pages on the land, sea, sky, our bodies, and animals, this book is a great jumping off point for even more in depth learning and exploration. The book's central message of being kind and taking care of the Earth is one that we full heartedly endorse, especially during uncertain times.


The Amazing Life Cycle of Butterflies by Kay Barnham. From caterpillar to chrysalis to butterfly, this book teaches kids scientific facts about butterflies through engaging and bold illustrations. Even parents might learn a thing or two about butterflies. There are also notes for parents and teachers at the end with activity and art suggestions to encourage further exploration and learning.



The Story of Owen: Dragon Slayer of Trondheim by E. K. Johnston. This is a great book for teenagers about Owen Thorskard, a budding dragonslayer who lives in rural Canada. Dragons in this world are attracted to carbon emissions, so the book does encourage readers to question our fossil-fuel based society. But most importantly, for young readers, it's an exciting story about Owen and his friend Siobhan and their quest to save the world.


TV Shows

Adults



Planet Earth II: An unprecedented look at our natural world with stunning visuals. This series gives us a look into the animal kingdom from the viewpoint of the animals themselves. It's basically earth eye-candy and features an array of gorgeous shots from 40 different countries. Visit islands, deserts, and even city streets to see how animals survive and thrive on an ever-changing planet.


Nature: This PBS docu-series covers a wide array of environmental topics, from white giraffes in Kenya to humpback whales in Northern California. Many episodes are available for free on your local PBS station.



Our Planet: While this series is packed with gorgeous shots of rarely-seen animal species, Our Planet also looks at the impact climate change is having throughout the world. Each episode is a somber reminder of how human behavior has far-reaching consequences.Kids

Kids



Tumble Leaf- Fig is a curious fox that goes on adventures to learn about how things work in the world and how to solve problems. Parents will love the applied science and your kids will love the colorful and cute animation. The pace of the show isn't too fast so there's plenty of time for kids to absorb what they are learning, but the show is so fun and quirky that they won't even realize that they are learning! The friendships that Fig has with his friends are also very endearing and teach some valuable lessons. This is definitely a must see show for preschoolers and younger elementary school kids.


Ask the Storybots- These five funny creatures answer a kid's question in each episode, such as "How Do Flowers Grow?" or Why Do We Have to Recycle? Facts are cleverly explained, along with explorations on letters, numbers, and colors. The creators consult subject experts and educators when creating each episode, but songs, animated characters, and guest celebrities make each show super engaging. If you don't know it already, this will be a hit with your preschool and elementary school aged kids.



WildKratts- Real-life brothers and zoologists Chris and Martin Kratt introduce kids to wild animals and teach them about animal behavior and habitats. Each episode focuses on a different wild animal that the Kratt brothers are going to go help. The show keeps it exciting by taking an inquisitive approach and with entertaining storylines. The Kratt brothers also show their love and respect for the natural world and science and inspire kids to do the same. This is a great show for elementary school aged kids.



Continent 7: Antarctica- This is a six-episode series that follows scientists as they live and work on Antarctica. From flying planes in extreme cold weather to climate change, this series will definitely keep older kids interested while also being educational. With beautiful imagery and drama that emerges from being in such a harsh environment, it's a great show to learn about how science is done and about an important ecosystem. Adults will also learn a lot and enjoy this as well!

Life

DIY Non-Toxic Hand Sanitizer

Stay protected with our easy, three ingredient sanitizer!

Making your own hand sanitizer is easier than you think! This DIY version is perfect for when you're feeling crafty or if (in a worse case scenario) you can't find hand sanitizer in stores. This three ingredient hand sanitizer will keep you protected from germs while you're on-the-go without any unnecessary or harmful ingredients. All you need is: rubbing alcohol, aloe vera gel, and essential oils (if you want some fragrance). Make sure to only use rubbing alcohol that's 90% alcohol or higher. According to the CDC, hand sanitizer has to be at least 60% alcohol to be effective. Our rubbing alcohol will be diluted a bit by the aloe vera, which is why a high alcohol percentage is needed!



⁠⁠We recommend using a spray bottle with this hand sanitizer. A squeeze bottle will work too but it'll be a little more runny.


Related Because Health Articles:

6 Non-Toxic Hand Sanitizers

8 Non-Toxic Hand Soaps

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What You Need To Know About COVID-19

A straightforward guide to the novel virus

Imager header source: CDC

COVID-19 has jumped from an obscure, local outbreak to a global pandemic in a matter of months. Its novel status and fast transmission rate have left many feeling anxious and worried about what the future holds. We break down everything you know about COVID-19 so far and the best ways to protect yourself.

What is COVID-19?

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a novel coronavirus that was first reported in Wuhan, China in December 2019. There are many different coronaviruses, including the common cold, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) (2). The virus has since spread worldwide and, as of March 24, 2020, has infected over 400,000 people. Estimates put the mortality rate between 1-3%, which is much higher than the mortality rate for the flu.

Symptoms

Since this is a new virus, we don't have a complete picture of all of the signs and symptoms of this disease. The most common symptoms of COVID-19 include a dry cough, fever, and fatigue; symptoms start appearing on an average of 5-6 days after infection (range is 1-14 days) (1). For most people COVID-19 is a mild illness and they can recover at home without any special treatment. About 1 in 6 COVID-19 cases become serious and require hospitalization (2). Older people and people with underlying health conditions are especially at risk of developing a serious case of COVID-19.

COVID-19 is thought to spread quickly from people who are in close contact with each other (within 6 feet) (3). The WHO states "the disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth which are spread when a person with COVID-19 coughs or exhales. These droplets land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then catch COVID-19 by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. People can also catch COVID-19 if they breathe in droplets from a person with COVID-19 who coughs out or exhales droplets" (1). COVID-19 has also been shown to survive on surfaces. One study found that COVID-19 was able to survive on stainless steel, cardboard, and copper for at least 72 hours (5).

How to Stay Safe

If you're in the high-risk category, you should stay home as much as possible and avoid large crowds or gatherings. Everyone else should practice good hygiene techniques and implement social distancing.

Washing your hands frequently throughout the day is one of the best ways to stay protected against COVID-19. Normal soap is just as effective in protecting against COVID-19 as antibacterial soap. Make sure you're scrubbing your hands for at least 20 seconds every time you wash them and to follow this helpful graph from the WHO:

Source: WHO

Use hand sanitizer if you're out and don't have access to a sink. Make sure the hand sanitizer contains at least 60% alcohol; a higher alcohol content is better at killing germs. The CDC states: "when using hand sanitizer, apply the product to the palm of one hand (read the label to learn the correct amount) and rub the product all over the surfaces of your hands until your hands are dry" (6).

It's important to use whatever soap or sanitizer is available while you're out and about, but we also like to have some non-toxic options at home. Our non-toxic hand soap roundup, non-toxic hand sanitizer roundup, DIY hand sanitizer guide, and non-toxic hand cream roundup will help keep you protected without the use of harmful ingredients .

Along with person-to-person contact, many counties are also experiencing community spread. Community spread means some people who have gotten COVID-19 aren't sure where or how they were exposed to the virus. At this stage of the outbreak, it's really important to limit the spread of transmission. By doing what we can to limit the spread of COVID-19, we'll be able to "flatten the curve"... AKA avoid overwhelming our healthcare systems and ensure that the sickest patients will be able to receive the care they need.


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Many cities and states are currently under a shelter in place order. Please follow all rules and regulations put in place by your local government or public health official. Shelter in place usually means you can't leave your house except for necessary travel like getting groceries or medicine or for brief outdoor exercise. Unessential businesses must close or have their employees work from home.

Even if you're not under a shelter in place order, you must practice social distancing. Since this virus is spread through close contact (within 6 feet), putting distance between you and others in your community can stop transmission. You can try social distancing by avoiding supermarkets during peak hours or watching a movie at home instead of going to the theater.

Are Children More At Risk?

While there have been cases in children and infants, reports from China are showing most COVID-19 cases occur in adults. (4) Data is limited, but there seem to be fewer severe cases in children. Most children that tested positive for COVID-19 have only had mild symptoms.

What To Do If You're Sick

If you're feeling mildly sick and you're worried you may have COVID-19, stay home and contact your healthcare provider to ask about next steps. If you're experiencing serious symptoms like shortness of breath, you might want to head to your local ER. Wearing a face mask can help protect others around you and stop the spread of your illness. You don't need to stockpile masks, groceries, or medication if you're healthy though; this will limit supplies available to healthcare workers and those who are ill.


While the outbreak of a new virus is scary, knowledge is power. It's important to stay informed and follow all recommendations from your local healthcare officials. Together we can limit the spread of COVID-19 and help protect the health of our community.

COVID-19 Resources

CDC: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Situation Summary

WHO: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak

WHO: Coronavirus disease (COVID-2019) situation reports

WHO: Q&A on coronaviruses (COVID-19)

Johns Hopkins University: Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE)


References:
  1. https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019
  2. https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html
  4. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/specific-groups/children-faq.html
  5. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc2004973?query=featured_home
  6. https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/show-me-the-science-hand-sanitizer.html
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