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Life

Your Summer Guide to Water Safety

How to Promote Fun and Prevent Drowning

Summer has arrived! Cue the backyard BBQs, ice cream sandwiches (or DIY popsicles), and Will Smith jams. During long, hot days, water activities are basically a necessity for creating fun memories and staying cool. Unfortunately, water-related accidents are a leading cause of injury and death for young children (4). So to keep things fun this summer, let's talk about drowning prevention.

Drowning happens in seconds and often quietly (1,3). Permanent disability can result even when drowning isn't fatal (3), since any prolonged oxygen disruption injures our brains. Though it can happen to anyone, drowning is the second most common cause of death for 1-4 year olds (3). Almost 90% of these incidents occur in home pools and hot tubs5,6 (and anything that collects water, even buckets, poses a risk) (3). To keep the children in your life safe and cool, here are 5 water safety tips as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, CDC, National Safety Council, Pool Safely, and Red Cross.

1. Kids' water activities require close supervision at all times

Most drowning incidents occur unsupervised when adults briefly step away or become distracted (4). For this reason, children need vigilant supervision by a designated adult whenever they're around water (4). We can appreciate a relaxing poolside novel or margarita, but the responsible adult/Water Watcher (7) needs to be completely free of alcohol impairment and any distractions (not even Insta). Consider water supervision to be like your greatest Netflix binge – your attention is totally focused, and you don't want to miss a thing. For young children the guiding principle is "touch supervision"– being within arm's reach at all times (3). 5-9 year olds are more likely to drown at public pools (4), so designate a supervising adult even when lifeguards are present (3).

2. Modest safety measures make a massive difference

Physical safety measures are imperative, especially when delightfully curious and unintentionally stealthy toddlers attempt to swim without you! Installing the right type of fence can reduce drowning risk by over 80% – 4-sided pool fences (completely isolating the pool) are far more effective than 3-sided property line fences (3). The safest fences measure at least 4 feet high, prevent climbing, and have self-latching, self-closing gates (3,7). Door alarms and rigid pool covers are also preventive, though their effectiveness is less studied (1). Always check that the pool you use has intact anti-entrapment drain covers (mandated by federal law) to prevent suction-related accidents (7). For portable pools, check out this specific safety guidance.

3. Life jackets are way better than floaties

Sadly those super cute floaty wings aren't designed for safety, according to the CDC, and should not replace life jackets (3) (on the upside, this means less flimsy plastic!). Young children and inexperienced swimmers should wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacketwhenever near water (1,9). And, regardless of swimming ability, all children need USCG-approved life jackets if playing around lakes or the ocean (2). Life jackets are only effective if they fit well, so check the weight and size limits before using (9). Remember that nothing replaces close supervision! (To help start your life jacket search, we tracked down a more eco-friendly option.)

4. Teach children swimming and water safety

Learning to swim is crucial for water safety. We all benefit from learning how to swim, and swimming lessons can prevent drowning in 1-4 year olds (3). It's never too early (or too late!) to learn – YMCA and community centers often provide affordable lessons for all ages. (We get that communal activities are probably not your jam with the current Covid-19 situation, but, at some point, formal swim lessons could be a fun family activity.) Knowing how to swim does not make us "drown proof" though, so we still need to exercise caution with kids of any swimming ability (1). Teaching children not to climb over pool fences, swim without an adult, or play near pool drains is also crucial for preventing drowning incidents (7).

5. Assess surroundings and swimming ability

Being aware of location-specific water dangers and knowing a swimmer's ability can help discern which activities are safe. Every water activity presents an assortment of fun and risk. Case in point: sprinklers are a simple joy but also an understated toe hazard (been there…). Oceans, rivers, and lakes offer wilder adventure yet can even prove dangerous for expert swimmers – rip currents are an infamous threat in oceans, and lakes and rivers can have undertows (6). Older children and adolescents are more likely to drown in these natural bodies of water (3). Since alcohol can impair your ability to assess surroundings and react appropriately, avoid drinking while swimming or supervising others (7).

Prevention first, but CPR can still save lives

We hope you'll never ever need to use CPR...ever. Prevention with the above measures can massively reduce drowning risk for everyone, but CPR is invaluable during a drowning incident and can improve the likelihood of the drowning victim's survival (3). The American Heart Association provides in-person Family and Friends CPR courses, as well as socially distanced, at-home instruction with Family and Friends CPR DVD or Adult/Child CPR training kits (includes a training manikin and DVD – fun for the whole family!).

With safe water play, we know your summer days will be full of adventure and excitement. Have fun!


References

1. https://www.aappublications.org/news/2019/03/15/drowning031519

2. https://www.cdc.gov/safechild/drowning/

3. https://www.cdc.gov/HomeandRecreationalSafety/Water-Safety/waterinjuries-factsheet.html

4. https://www.cpsc.gov/s3fs-public/2020-Submersion-Report-4-29-20.pdf

5. https://www.cpsc.gov/s3fs-public/pdfs/blk_media_SafetyBarrierGuidelinesResPools.pdf

6. https://www.nsc.org/home-safety/tools-resources/seasonal-safety/drowning

7. https://www.poolsafely.gov/parents/safety-tips/

8.https://www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/water-safety/drowning-prevention-and-facts.html

9.https://www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/water-safety/swim-safety.html

We updated our sunscreen roundup for 2020 with the 10 best reviewed, non-toxic mineral sunscreens we could find. As always, we make sure that our picks are easy to find online and in stores.

Sunscreen in our minds is synonymous with summer and being outside! But there are so many choices, it's hard to know if what you're getting is something that actually works and that you will like. Not to mention that there are some questionable chemicals in sunscreens that are definitely horrible for coral reefs and might be endocrine disruptors that are absorbed through your skin and have been found to circulate in your blood. We'd prefer to stick with mineral sunscreens that basically act like a physical barrier to harmful UV rays.

These picks are great as everyday body and sport sunscreens. We always have one by the door so that every family member loads up before leaving the house. So look for one of our top 10 picks for non-toxic sunscreens the next time your tube is empty. Many of these brands have plenty of options in stick formats, with and without tints, and come in a variety of formulations for everyday wear, sweaty sports and beach days. Any of these are 10 options are safe for kids and babies too, but if you're looking for a specific baby or toddler sunscreen, be sure to check out our best 13 non-toxic baby sunscreen options. We also have a roundup of facial sunscreens that are formulated especially for everyday coverage that protects against wrinkles and spots but won't clog pores.


10 Best Non-Toxic Reef Safe Sunscreens


a) All Good Sport Sunscreen SPF 30 b) Babo Botanicals Clear Zinc Sunscreen SPF 30 c) Badger Clear Zinc Regular and Sport Sunscreen SPF 30 d) Blue Lizard Sensitive Sunscreen e) Bare Republic Mineral SPF 50 Sport Sunscreen Stick f) Block Island Natural Mineral Sunscreen SPF 30 g) Jason Mineral Sunscreen SPF 30 Broad Spectrum h) Juice Beauty SPF 30 Sport Sunscreen i) Thinksport Safe Sunscreen SPF 50 j) Two Peas Organics SPF 30 Unscented Mineral Sunscreen



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Life

18 Environmental Justice Organizations to Support Now

Because Black and Minority Communities Deserve Safe, Non-toxic, Healthy Environments

Environmental injustice plagues communities of color and needs to be tackled head on. Socioeconomic disparities and systemic racism are rooted in the past and continue to impact Black and ethnic minority communities, disproportionately exposing them to toxic and hazardous waste, air and water pollution, and other environmental exposures that have harmful health effects (1). These frontline communities experience the first and worst consequences of pollution and ecological change, like climate change.

Environmental justice organizations engage with local communities to achieve environmental health and justice, to prevent and reduce pollution, enforce equal environmental protections, and build healthy and safe living environments. Many groups are based in the communities they serve, but also work on issues of global importance such as petrochemical expansion and climate change.

Examples of Environmental Injustices

While the terms 'environmental justice' and 'environmental injustice' might be new to you, you're probably already familiar with real-world examples. The crisis of lead in drinking water in Flint, Michigan, the Atlantic Coast pipeline and the Keystone XL pipeline extension, the petrochemical industry in Louisiana known as "Cancer Alley," and Hurricane Maria's devastation in Puerto Rico all show how environmental injustice and racism can devastate communities.

How to Get Involved

Supporting environmental justice organizations is an important tool in creating a more equitable society. There are many ways to show your support; donating, volunteering, and amplifying an organization's mission are all easy ways to get involved.

There are many community-based, environmental justice groups. Environmental Justice Atlas, a website that maps environmental racism and social conflict, can help you find environmental justice organizations based in your community or region.

We've also made a list of a few organizations that environmentalists and public health advocates can support. You can check out what they are doing and learn more about environmental justice initiatives in your communities. There are many more, so this is just a start.

Alternatives for Community and Environment

ACE builds the power of communities of color and low-income communities in Massachusetts to eradicate environmental racism and classism, create healthy, sustainable communities, and achieve environmental justice.

Asian Pacific Environmental Network

All people have a right to a clean and healthy environment in which their communities can live, work, learn, play and thrive. Towards this vision, APEN brings together a collective voice to develop an alternative agenda for environmental, social and economic justice.

Black Women for Wellness

We utilize civic engagement, community education, policy and media outreach to address the health inequities of African American women and their children.

Center for Health, Environment and Justice

We train local leaders in the rural, low-wealth or working-class neighborhoods that are dumping ground for toxins, air pollution, and other environmental degradation. We help them build confidence and power by providing them with the strategies, network, policy analysis and scientific perspective necessary to make their communities healthy and green.

Climate Justice Alliance

The Climate Justice Alliance (CJA) formed in 2013 to create a new center of gravity in the climate movement by uniting frontline communities and organizations into a formidable force. Our translocal organizing strategy and mobilizing capacity is building a Just Transition away from extractive systems of production, consumption and political oppression, and towards resilient, regenerative and equitable economies.

Communities for a Better Environment

The mission of CBE is to build people's power in California's communities of color and low income communities to achieve environmental health and justice by preventing and reducing pollution and building green, healthy and sustainable communities and environments.

Deep South Center for Environmental Justice

The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice is dedicated to improving the lives of children and families harmed by pollution and vulnerable to climate change in the Gulf Coast Region through research, education, community and student engagement for policy change, as well as health and safety training for environmental careers.

East Michigan Environmental Action Council

To empower the Detroit community to protect, preserve and value the land, air and water. We build community power through environmental justice education, youth development and collaborative relationship building.

Environmental Justice Health Alliance

The Environmental Justice Health Alliance for Chemical Policy Reform supports diverse movement towards safe chemicals and clean energy that leaves no community or worker behind. The Environmental Justice Health Alliance (EJHA) organizes direct engagement in industry reform strategies by grassroots organizations in frontline communities to promote environmental justice outcomes.

Greenlining Institute

Greenlining is the solution to redlining. We advance economic opportunity and empowerment for people of color through advocacy, community and coalition building, research, and leadership development.

Hip Hop Caucus

Empowering communities impacted first and worst by injustice. We link culture and policy to make our movements bigger, more diverse, and more powerful. We exist for everyone who identifies with Hip Hop culture to come together for positive change. Being part of Hip Hop Caucus means you can use your cultural expression to shape your political experience.

Louisiana Bucket Brigade

The Louisiana Bucket Brigade uses grassroots action to create an informed, healthy society that holds the petrochemical industry and government accountable for the true costs of pollution to hasten the transition from fossil fuels.

Movement Generation Justice and Ecology Project

Movement Generation Justice & Ecology Project inspires and engages in transformative action towards the liberation and restoration of land, labor, and culture. We are rooted in vibrant social movements led by low-income communities and communities of color committed to a Just Transition away from profit and pollution and towards healthy, resilient and life-affirming local economies.

NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program

The NAACP ECJ Program was created to provide resources and support community leadership in addressing environmental injustices by advocating for these three objectives: 1) Reduce Harmful Emissions, Particularly Greenhouse Gases 2) Advance Energy Efficiency and Clean Energy 3) Strengthen Community Resilience and Livability.

North Carolina Environmental Justice Network

To promote health and environmental equality for all people of North Carolina through community action for clean industry, safe workplaces and fair access to all human and natural resources. We seek to accomplish these goals through organizing, advocacy, research, and education based on principles of economic equity and democracy for all people.

Outdoor Afro

Outdoor Afro has become the nation's leading, cutting edge network that celebrates and inspires Black connections and leadership in nature. We help people take better care of themselves, our communities, and our planet!

Texas Environmental Justice Advocacy Services

T.e.j.a.s is dedicated to providing community members with the tools necessary to create sustainable, environmentally healthy communities by educating individuals on health concerns and implications arising from environmental pollution, empowering individuals with an understanding of applicable environmental laws and regulations and promoting their enforcement, and offering community building skills and resources for effective community action and greater public participation.

We Act for Environmental Justice

WE ACT's mission is to build healthy communities by ensuring that people of color and/or low income residents participate meaningfully in the creation of sound and fair environmental health and protection policies and practices.

Life

Is Hair Dye Harmful to Your Health?

What to know before your next salon appointment

Dying your hair is a fun way to mix up your look. You can brighten things up with a few highlights, or even channel your inner rainbow and dye your hair blue, purple, or pink! It's estimated that 33% of women over the age of 18 use some sort of hair dye product (1). However, dyes contain thousands of chemicals, including endocrine‐disrupting compounds, carcinogens, and aromatic amines (2). To determine the health effects of hair dyes, scientists first experimented on rats. These studies found that exposure to hair dyes resulted in induced tumors among the rats (3). Because of the detrimental effects of hair dye on animals, researchers are now investigating whether there is a connection between these products and cancer in humans.

What Do the Studies Show?

A recent paper published in 2019 provided strong evidence that connected hair dye and chemical hair straightener use to breast cancer (2). This study collected responses from 47,000 women on:

  1. how often they used permanent, semi-permanent, or temporary hair dye and hair straighteners before they joined the study,
  2. how often hair dye and straightener was applied at home, and
  3. whether the dye used was a dark color or a light color or both.

After following these women for over 8 years, permanent hair dye was found to be associated with a 45% increased risk in breast cancer among black women and 7% increased risk in white women (2). It was found that black women were at greater risk for breast cancer because hair products marketed to them had higher concentrations of estrogens and endocrine-disrupting compounds. Chemical hair straighteners were also found to increase risk of breast cancer.

Despite these stark findings, there is no definitive evidence that the use of hair dyes cause cancer. While there are multiple studies like the one described above that link hair dyes with an increased risk of breast cancer, there are others that fail to produce similar results. Research on the association between hair dyes and other cancers such as non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, and bladder cancer have yielded equally inconclusive results (4). This discrepancy has made it difficult for regulatory agencies to take a side on this debate.

Looking to the Future

While dying your hair with traditional synthetic permanent hair dyes may be a fun way to spruce up your look, these products may be harmful to your health. Because of the mixed results from the scientific literature, it is too early to make a firm recommendation on how to handle permanent hair dyes. However, in the interim, those who are concerned for their health or who are at a high risk for cancers should think about using natural, non-toxic hair dyes. These products include henna, which can be used to dye hair a darker color, and lemon juice for highlights.

References
  1. Huncharek, Michael, and Bruce Kupelnick. "Personal Use of Hair Dyes and the Risk of Bladder Cancer: Results of a Meta-Analysis." Public Health Reports (Washington, D.C. : 1974), Association of Schools of Public Health, 2005, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15736329.
  2. Eberle, Carolyn E., et al. "Hair Dye and Chemical Straightener Use and Breast Cancer Risk in a Large US Population of Black and White Women." Wiley Online Library, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 3 Dec. 2019, onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ijc.32738.
  3. "Permanent Hair Dyes, Straighteners Linked to Higher Breast Cancer Risk." Breastcancer.org, 21 Jan. 2020, www.breastcancer.org/research-news/hair-dye-and-straighteners-linked-to-higher-risk.
  4. "Hair Dyes and Cancer Risk." National Cancer Institute, www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/myths/hair-dyes-fact-sheet.
Life

DIY Yoga Mat Cleaner

Because when was the last time you cleaned your mat?

Yoga is a great activity to try during the pandemic. It offers a great indoor workout and the whole family can join in! There are also a ton of free yoga videos online too, so you can get top-notch instruction without leaving your house. Plus, you don't need a ton of equipment to practice yoga; all you really need is a yoga mat! Yoga mats create a layer of padding between you and the ground that makes your practice more comfortable.

Like any workout equipment, yoga mats need to be cleaned every once and a while. A clean mat will make your practice extra om-mazing! That's why we love this DIY yoga mat spray. It will keep your mat clean and smelling fresh. Plus, you probably already have these ingredients at your house! No need for an additional trip to the grocery store required.



Simply mix 1 part vinegar to 3 parts water in a glass spray bottle. You can add a few drops of tea tree or eucalyptus essential oil if you want your cleaner to have a scent! This cleaner is as easy to use as it is to make! Just spray your mat and let the cleaner completely dry.

It seems like everyone is staying home these days. Whether it's because of a mandatory order or out of an abundance of precaution, people are staying close to home and limiting travel. Social distancing is incredibly important to stop the spread of COVID-19, but staying at home means we suddenly have a lot more time on our hands. But that doesn't mean we have to be bored! There's still plenty to keep us busy as we shelter in place or practice social distancing. We've thought of some easy, outdoor-oriented activities you can do while on a walk or while getting some fresh air with your kids.

Activities for Adults

  • Do an outdoor guided meditation. These are difficult times and anxiety might be higher than normal. Meditation is proven to help lower stress and anxiety, as is going outdoors. Why not combine the two? There are a lot of free guided meditation online or on Youtube. We recommend going on a short walk, then finding somewhere to sit and meditate. Walking meditations are also a great way to stretch your legs while practicing mindfulness.
  • This is a great time to try a new hobby! Why not take up gardening? Gardening can help lower stress and anxiety, burn calories, and help you get outside more. Plus, you can also grow your own food! A meal just tastes better when the produce comes from your own backyard, right? Before you pick up your trowel, check out our guides on soil, composting, and growing veggies indoors (in case you're an apartment dweller).
  • Take a sketchbook with you on your next walk and sketch five things that make you happy. This could be a beautiful flower, a cute dog, or even just the sunny sky! This is a great way to keep you present during your walk and a way to focus on the positive.

Activities for Kids

  • Take a walk around your neighborhood or visit an open space or park for a hike and bring a pouch to collect natural objects such as flowers, rocks, leaves, sticks, and pinecones. It's a great way to have kids notice what's around them and to appreciate the beauty in what may seem like everyday objects. Then when you get home, have the kids organize the objects into alphabet letters or numbers and glue them to form nature collages. If you have older kids, use these objects to illustrate a scene from a favorite book or to make nature art.
  • We're definitely on board with getting outside for a bit of exercise, but kids sometimes it takes a bit of work to keep kids interested. Another idea for a hike or walk outside is to give your kids a camera (or your phone) and have them take pictures of things that they think are interesting or beautiful. Could be a flower, unusual shaped tree, colorful mailbox, or anything else they see. When you get home, print the pictures and have the kids make a collage. If you have older kids, have them write a story with the collage as an inspiration.
  • Another way to keep an outdoor walk interesting for kids is to bring a notebook and have them draw a map of your walk as you go. Make sure to note landmarks, unique natural features, or streets in your neighborhood. For older kids, this activity can become more challenging by having them note distance, elevation, and cardinal directions.



It seems like everyone is staying home these days. Whether it's because of a mandatory order or out of an abundance of precaution, people are staying close to home and limiting travel. Social distancing is incredibly important to stop the spread of COVID-19, but staying at home means we suddenly have a lot more time on our hands. That's why we compiled a list of our favorite environment-related tv shows and books! Half of the recommendations for kids, so everyone in the household can continue to learn about the environment!

Books

Adults



The Overstory by Richard Powers: Winner of the 2019 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction, this novel follows nine characters from drastically different walks of life and highlights their own unique relationship with trees. The Overstory tells a tale of activism, environmentalism, and resilience.


Horizon by Barry Lopez: Travel the globe with Lopez as he observes the natural world around him. With a quiet disposition and keen eye he listens to stories of researchers and locals, piecing together an understanding of human's complex connections to nature.


The Future We Choose: Surviving the Climate Crisis by Christiana Figueres and Tom Rivett-Carnac: Figueres and Rivett-Carnac, who led negotiations for the United Nations during the 2015 Paris Agreement, discusses two scenarios: a world that meets the Paris climate targets, and a world that does not. The Future We Choose discusses how we can all tackle the climate crisis with determination and optimism.

Kids


Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth by Oliver Jeffers, illustrator of the bestseller The Day the Crayons Quit. This is a beautifully illustrated and heart warming book that serves as a tour through the Earth. With curiosity inducing pages on the land, sea, sky, our bodies, and animals, this book is a great jumping off point for even more in depth learning and exploration. The book's central message of being kind and taking care of the Earth is one that we full heartedly endorse, especially during uncertain times.


The Amazing Life Cycle of Butterflies by Kay Barnham. From caterpillar to chrysalis to butterfly, this book teaches kids scientific facts about butterflies through engaging and bold illustrations. Even parents might learn a thing or two about butterflies. There are also notes for parents and teachers at the end with activity and art suggestions to encourage further exploration and learning.



The Story of Owen: Dragon Slayer of Trondheim by E. K. Johnston. This is a great book for teenagers about Owen Thorskard, a budding dragonslayer who lives in rural Canada. Dragons in this world are attracted to carbon emissions, so the book does encourage readers to question our fossil-fuel based society. But most importantly, for young readers, it's an exciting story about Owen and his friend Siobhan and their quest to save the world.


TV Shows

Adults



Planet Earth II: An unprecedented look at our natural world with stunning visuals. This series gives us a look into the animal kingdom from the viewpoint of the animals themselves. It's basically earth eye-candy and features an array of gorgeous shots from 40 different countries. Visit islands, deserts, and even city streets to see how animals survive and thrive on an ever-changing planet.


Nature: This PBS docu-series covers a wide array of environmental topics, from white giraffes in Kenya to humpback whales in Northern California. Many episodes are available for free on your local PBS station.



Our Planet: While this series is packed with gorgeous shots of rarely-seen animal species, Our Planet also looks at the impact climate change is having throughout the world. Each episode is a somber reminder of how human behavior has far-reaching consequences.Kids

Kids



Tumble Leaf- Fig is a curious fox that goes on adventures to learn about how things work in the world and how to solve problems. Parents will love the applied science and your kids will love the colorful and cute animation. The pace of the show isn't too fast so there's plenty of time for kids to absorb what they are learning, but the show is so fun and quirky that they won't even realize that they are learning! The friendships that Fig has with his friends are also very endearing and teach some valuable lessons. This is definitely a must see show for preschoolers and younger elementary school kids.


Ask the Storybots- These five funny creatures answer a kid's question in each episode, such as "How Do Flowers Grow?" or Why Do We Have to Recycle? Facts are cleverly explained, along with explorations on letters, numbers, and colors. The creators consult subject experts and educators when creating each episode, but songs, animated characters, and guest celebrities make each show super engaging. If you don't know it already, this will be a hit with your preschool and elementary school aged kids.



WildKratts- Real-life brothers and zoologists Chris and Martin Kratt introduce kids to wild animals and teach them about animal behavior and habitats. Each episode focuses on a different wild animal that the Kratt brothers are going to go help. The show keeps it exciting by taking an inquisitive approach and with entertaining storylines. The Kratt brothers also show their love and respect for the natural world and science and inspire kids to do the same. This is a great show for elementary school aged kids.



Continent 7: Antarctica- This is a six-episode series that follows scientists as they live and work on Antarctica. From flying planes in extreme cold weather to climate change, this series will definitely keep older kids interested while also being educational. With beautiful imagery and drama that emerges from being in such a harsh environment, it's a great show to learn about how science is done and about an important ecosystem. Adults will also learn a lot and enjoy this as well!

Life

DIY Non-Toxic Hand Sanitizer

Stay protected with our easy, three ingredient sanitizer!

Making your own hand sanitizer is easier than you think! This DIY version is perfect for when you're feeling crafty or if (in a worse case scenario) you can't find hand sanitizer in stores. This three ingredient hand sanitizer will keep you protected from germs while you're on-the-go without any unnecessary or harmful ingredients. All you need is: rubbing alcohol, aloe vera gel, and essential oils (if you want some fragrance). Make sure to only use rubbing alcohol that's 90% alcohol or higher. According to the CDC, hand sanitizer has to be at least 60% alcohol to be effective. Our rubbing alcohol will be diluted a bit by the aloe vera, which is why a high alcohol percentage is needed!



⁠⁠We recommend using a spray bottle with this hand sanitizer. A squeeze bottle will work too but it'll be a little more runny.


Related Because Health Articles:

6 Non-Toxic Hand Sanitizers

8 Non-Toxic Hand Soaps

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