Food

Stop Eating Lunch at Your Desk

Seriously, here are 5 reasons why

Work can be crazy, and working through lunch almost feels expected at many offices. But, if you can actually take a break, even just a few times a week, it can make a big difference for your physical, mental, and social well-being. Here are some of the top benefits of not eating at your desk.


1. Avoiding Chemicals, like Flame-Retardants

A lot of technological equipment has flame-retardants in the casing, like computers, keyboards, even wireless modems. Dr. Todd Whitehead of The Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment at The University of California, Berkeley, suggests that not eating lunch in front of your computer can help lower your exposure to flame retardants from these items. Flame-retardants are typically not chemically bound to the products (basically they are just sprayed on at the end) meaning they easily escape and stick to other things, like your fingers. When this happens and you don't wash your hands before you eat, you can also end up eating a small dose of flame retardants, which have been linked to problems like reproductive issues, neurological impairment, and cancer. "People have done experiments where they have looked at the frequency of hand washing and levels of flame-retardants in people's blood. You can see that people who wash their hands more frequently have lower concentrations of those chemicals," shares Dr. Whitehead. Think about what you do at your desk on a typical day. Most likely, you are constantly typing on your keyboard, maybe answering a phone call, and snacking on something. This is why, getting up, washing your hands, and keeping your lunch away from your desk (or at least your computer) will help limit the amount of flame retardants you're unintentionally eating by working through lunch.

2. Fresh Air

If you can sneak in a walk around the block while you break for lunch that would be ideal. Not only do you get the obvious benefit of a bit of exercise, but the walk outside will get some fresh air into your lungs, vitamin D on a sunny day, and will help clear your brain to make you more productive during your afternoon. People who are able to take a walk during the lunch break also tend to feel less stress during work (1, 3).

3. Eye Health

While eye professionals have determined that long term, continued use of screens won't cause permanent damage; it can cause headaches and dry eyes. Many eye professionals suggest following the 20-20-20 rule, which is to look at something at least 20 feet away for 20 seconds every 20 minutes (2). While this might not necessarily mean you need to get up from your computer at lunch, giving your eyes a break from all that screen time can't hurt.

4. Social Contact

Even if you don't make it out of the office, making it to the kitchen or the break room will open the opportunity for you to meet someone or say hello. Talking to other people is generally a good thing, and who knows, you might make a new work friend in the process. You can even share some tips with each other, too, like where to find the best coffee in the neighborhood, or where to get super cool, toxic free lunch containers (hint: check out our roundup of lunch containers).

5. Mental Break

Sometimes you just need a mental break. Taking a few minutes in the middle of your day to stand up, get the blood flowing, and think about something other than work can actually be good for you and your productivity (4). It allows parts of your brain to rest and recharge, just like your muscles have to do when you are working out.


References

2) https://www.aao.org/eye-health/tips-prevention/computer-usage

3) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25559067

4) https://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/17/jobs/take-break...

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No matter where you live, sustainability is becoming a hot topic. It might be a friendly reminder sign to bring your reusable bag to the grocery store, a city government conversation about not using straws, or it could run as deep as cities committing to be zero waste - some as early as next year. With all of this comes the question of what sort of products are best for the world? Is biodegradable really any different from compostable. Should I opt for compostable options over recyclable ones? Does reusing things help?

All of these are great questions! And the answer to all of them has an impact on our planet, and oftentimes our health, too.

So, first of all, what do all of these different terms that are being thrown around really mean? Let's start with the one we probably have all heard the most: recyclable.

Recyclable

Recycling is the process of taking a product and breaking it down to use it again, often as a raw material. We all know that we can recycle paper, plastic, and cans. In most places, recycling facilities can also deal with glass. All of this is great, but let's break down the concept a little bit more. Quick note, each city is slightly different and you should check exactly what can and can't be recycled in your neighborhood before you just assume you are good to go.

Tossing something you think or hope can be recycled into the recycling bin is often called wishful or aspirational recycling. While your heart is in the right place, doing this might actually be worse than just trashing something you aren't clear on. Why? Because that one iffy thing can actually be enough to compromise a full batch of recycling, which could mean everything ends up in the landfill instead of just the one questionable item. In those situations, the best option would be to confirm before you dispose of it. And, if your neighborhood doesn't recycle it, ask your city to start accepting those items. But, in the meantime, if you don't know, don't just hope it can be recycled.

Back to the topic at hand, what is actually recyclable? Most plastics that hold their shape can be recycled (like water bottles, food containers, bottles for household items, etc.). In some places, they have even started being able to accept items like plastic grocery bags, shrink wrap, and plastic wrap if it is packaged correctly. Other commonly accepted items for recycling include paper, cardboard, unbroken glass and metal (including tinfoil if it's clean and in a large enough ball).

Some common items that need special recycling (but are in fact recyclable) include: batteries, electronics, and fabric (and clothing). Check with your waste management provider to see what can and can't be recycled in your neighborhood.

Compostable

This is becoming more common in larger metropolitan cities. Composting is a way to turn items made of natural materials back into a nutrient rich soil. Often times the compost is for food scraps, but other items that are fully compostable include yard scraps, dead flowers, items made of untreated wood, and those made of pure cotton. While starting with food scraps is the easiest, the more you look around the more you will find items for other parts of your life that are completely compostable.

Compostable items are great because instead of going to landfill or needing to be processed and turned into something else, they actually breakdown themselves in a natural setting (or in an industrial facility) to create something useful right away.

But, what happens if you have items that are compostable but don't have access to composting. Side note: you can create a compost pile in your own backyard (or under your sink). We know that isn't for everyone though. So, what happens if these items end up in just in your standard trash bin? You might think that it's still an improvement and they will break down, right? Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but that's not exactly the case. Compostable items break down into nutrient rich soil only if they have the right conditions. And a traditional landfill is not a place with the right conditions.

Industrial facilities have the optimal conditions for composting. These facilities regulate temperature, moisture, and air flow in order to ensure a compostable item breaks down as fast as possible. At-home compost is more prone to temperature/moisture/air flow changes and might not break down as quickly as it would in an industrial setting.

Composting works best when the items have access to oxygen and are regularly being turned over. A landfill is basically the opposite. It's an anaerobic environment where most of the pile actually doesn't have access to oxygen. That means that if your compostable takeout container ends up in the landfill, it won't break down as intended. Instead, it will mostly likely just act like a plastic container and stay around for a lot longer than intended.

So, while recognizing compostable items is a good first step, purchasing and using compostable items in place of other items has the biggest impact when they actually end up in a compost pile. Although, we do want to mention that the production of plastic is pretty nasty for a lot of reasons, so opting for compostable items made of cotton, bamboo, and even PLA (that vegetable based plastic cup you see at some restaurants now), is probably still better for the environment and your health.

Biodegradable

The dictionary definition of biodegradable is a substance that can break down naturally without causing any harm (1). This is very similar to compostable, but the biggest difference is that what it breaks down to doesn't cause harm as opposed to starting with an organically occurring materials. Therefore, man-made or chemically produced items can still be considered biodegradable, while not necessarily being compostable. This is like a square being a rectangle but a rectangle not being a square. Those items that are compostable are also biodegradable, but not everything biodegradable is compostable.

Again, biodegradable options are still a step in the right direction. It does mean that the ingredients break down over time (that's a perk) and when they do break down, the base components are not harmful to the environment (also a perk).

One drawback of biodegradable materials is that there is not necessarily a timeframe for when the items will break down. It could be many years before they start to degrade. In most cases, biodegradable isn't really saying much about the product. Think of it the same way you do products labeled "natural."

The bottom line

If we were to rank these terms for which ones are best for the planet and in turn our health, we'd say first look for items that are compostable, recyclable, and lastly biodegradable. Compostable items, if properly disposed of, will break down completely and can them be used to grow more resources. Recyclable items can be turned into raw materials that can then be used to make new things without needing to create completely new resources. And finally, biodegradable options will eventually break down, but we don't know when and there is no plan to use them for any additional benefit.

Of course, we are big proponents of reusing items when possible, but we also know that it can be incredibly hard to live your life without there being some items that needs to be disposed of. So, go on with this new information to help you think about what to toss and how to do it best.





References

  1. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/biodegradable
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