Or convert the Swiffer you already have into a non-toxic, planet-friendly option

Non-Toxic, Eco-Friendly Alternatives to Swiffers

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Who hasn't had a Swiffer before? The promise of an easy-to-use and affordable sweeping, mopping and dusting solution is hard to say no to! While Swiffer products are quite convenient and user friendly, have you ever thought about how much trash those single-use pads generate and what toxic chemicals might be used in their cleaning solutions? Well we're here to give you the low down. If you already have a Swiffer, we have some tips on how to use your Swiffer in a more environmentally conscious way with non-toxic ingredients. And if you don't have one, but want some just as convenient recommendations on mopping and dusting we have you covered too.

Why You Might Want to Think Twice About Swiffers

Ever take a big whiff when you bust open your new package of refillable Swiffer wet pads? Well, sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but those flowery and attractive smells contain fragrances and other harmful ingredients, which often carry phthalates, asthmagens (1) and other chemicals of concern. When these fragrance chemicals vaporize into your household, they can trigger asthma attacks, and aggravate sinus conditions; they can disrupt hormones, cause headaches, eyes, nose and throat irritation, and produce neurotoxic symptoms, like loss of coordination, and forgetfulness (2).

Other ingredients in Swiffer products have also been found to aid in developing resistance to antibiotics over time (3). This means that germs like bacteria and fungi start building the capacity to defeat the drugs that are designed to kill them. When this happens, this can require extended hospital stays, more follow-up visits to the doctor, and other costly and toxic treatment alternatives (4). It's not just humans that are impacted either, these products are also very toxic to aquatic animals (5,6). Makes us think twice about using them all around the house!

Not only is it a good idea to steer clear of these chemicals, but can we talk about the trash? Easy disposal of these toxic, non-biodegradable products, like the refill pads, has resulted in an exuberant amount of unnecessary waste and has nearly destroyed our environment (7). Refillable Swiffer pads are made from polyester which is derived from fossil fuels (8), and are contributing to the degradation of our ecosystems and wildlife (9). These persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are harmful toxins that will continue to corrode our environment for centuries, as they occupy landfills and slowly leak toxins into soil and water over time (9). What a mess!

The good news is that there are simple alternative methods you can start using that are more protective of our health (and the planet's) well-being. Plus, since you don't have to purchase refill pads, they are great for your budget too. There are even easy hacks to turn the Swiffer product you already have into a non-toxic option.

How to Make Your Swiffer Non-Toxic and Earth-Friendly

Get a reusable washable microfiber pad and ditch the single-use ones. Microfibers are extremely effective at capturing germs and small particles (10). These microfiber mop pads work for both the Swiffer sweepers and WetJet. Here are some we like:

Just throw that bad boy into the washer after you're done using it and it's ready to be used the next time you need it. And if you want a completely free way to do this, you can even try using an old fuzzy sock and wrap that around the bottom of your WetJet and voila, you're all ready to start moppin'.

If you have an old washcloth you can also place that into the corners of the holes of your traditional Swiffer to secure the cloth. You'll want to make sure to dip the cloth into your cleaning solution before you attach it to the mop and/or you can add the cleaning solution to a spray bottle to spray the surface as well.

DIY Your Own Safe and Effective Cleaning Solution

If you've got the Swiffer WetJet, make sure the refill bottle is thoroughly cleaned out with soap and water, then go ahead and add your preferred non-toxic cleaning solution. There are several ways you can create your own safe and effective floor cleaner, but here are some of our favorites:

  • Add ½ tsp of liquid soap to each gallon of water
  • Add ½ cup vinegar to every gallon of water

When the floors are really dirty use liquid soap solution to really mop up that grime and dirt. If things have been more chill around the house, use the vinegar solution. We've heard that using the vinegar on hardwood floors is not a problem, but you should check what type of finish your floors have, and do a test sample somewhere out of sight just to be sure.

Convenient, Non-toxic, and Budget Friendly Swiffer Alternatives

If you don't own a Swiffer, bless your heart. Here are two of our favorite Swiffer alternatives for getting your floor clean.

Steam Mops

Another green alternative you can use is a steam mop. Steam mops work by heating up the water to really high temperatures inside it's chamber and dispensing it as steam, which is then dispersed through a cloth or pad. The steam helps to loosen up the dirt and grime from your floors, and the high temps help to kill germs and bacteria on hard surfaces. No harmful chemicals needed!

Steam mops are typically safe to use on vinyl, ceramic, and porcelain tile floors, but you may want to double check with your flooring brand to make sure using steam won't void your floor's warranty. You should also never use steam mops on any unsealed, peeling or unfinished floors, and although manufacturers claim it is safe to do so, use caution with any wood or laminate flooring.

Spray Mops

Spray mops are super convenient and easy to use on all types of floors, including hardwood and laminate flooring. Plus, no need for any buckets or wringing! Just add your washable/reusable microfiber mop pad and pre-made non-toxic solution to the dispenser and you are ready to have at it!



References:
  1. https://zsds3.zepinc.com/ehswww/zep/result/direct_link.jsp?P_LANGU=E&P_SYS=2&P_SSN=11337&C001=DISC2&C002=ZCAL&C003=E&C013=AF7231E
  2. https://noharm-uscanada.org/issues/us-canada/fragrance-chemicals
  3. https://www.ajicjournal.org/article/S0196-6553(18)30424-3/pdf
  4. https://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/about.html
  5. https://www.ewg.org/guides/cleaners/5288-SwifferSweeperWetMoppingClothsOpenWindowFresh/
  6. https://www.ewg.org/guides/cleaners/2819-SwifferWetJetMultiPurposeCleanerOpenWindowFresh/
  7. https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/realestate/2005/05/21/disposable-wipes-no-throw-away-issue/22e091b2-7bc9-4b01-a9c3-6ca1c00f9cfc/
  8. https://www.cmu.edu/gelfand/lgc-educational-media/polymers/natural-synthetic-polymers/index.html#:~:text=Synthetic%20polymers%20are%20derived%20from,polyester%2C%20Teflon%2C%20and%20epoxy.&text=Examples%20of%20naturally%20occurring%20polymers,%2C%20DNA%2C%20cellulose%20and%20proteins.
  9. https://sciencing.com/environmental-problems-caused-by-synthetic-polymers-12732046.html
  10. https://archive.epa.gov/region9/waste/archive/web/pdf/mops.pdf
COVID-19

How to Properly Wear and Clean Your Face Mask

An important part of keeping yourself and others protected

Whether you're on a walk, going to the grocery store, or picking up a prescription, wearing a mark is now a standard part of life. While masks may seem like a hassle to wear, they're an important tool in helping slow the spread of the virus and decrease the number of infections (1). Many countries and local governments now require citizens to wear a mask while outside, and the CDC recommends wearing a mask even if it's not required by law. But how do you wear a mask properly and how do you keep a reusable face mask clean? A mask that isn't properly cleaned may pose a health risk to yourself and others. We have some simple tips that will make wearing and washing your mask a little more straightforward!

Why You Should Wear a Mask

Wearing a mask is important when you're in situations where socially distancing isn't possible (2). If you're healthy, a face mask can help protect you from breathing in germs. If you're sick, a face mask can help prevent others from getting sick as well (4). More research is needed on this subject in non-medical settings, but the available evidence suggests they can be a good precautionary practice. , One preprint study found that wearing a mask can be "very slightly protective against primary infection from casual community contact, and modestly protective against household infections when both infected and uninfected members wear facemasks" (3).

If your state or county requires a face mask, please comply with local ordinances. Many retailers and employers are also requiring masks for when employees return to work or when you enter an establishment. If you're going on a walk or an errand, use your best judgement of when you should wear a mask. It's always a good idea to have one when you leave the house just in case you find yourself in a situation where you're around more people than you had planned,

How to Wear a Mask

The most important part of wearing a mask is making sure it fits correctly! All masks should fit snugly around the sides of your face while covering your nose and mouth, but they shouldn't be restrictive or make it hard to breathe. All masks should be secured with ties or with loops that go around your ears (1). If you're using a cloth face mask, you should be able to launder it without changing its size or shape (1).

Here are the best practices for keeping your mask clean and keeping yourself safe:

  • Although it's tempting to rewear a disposable mask, they were designed to only be used once. If you sanitize or wash a disposable mask, you're most likely damaging it so it won't be as effective.
  • Cloth masks can be reworn, but they have to be washed with laundry soap or detergent after every use. Yes, this includes after your 5 minute walk to the post office or any situation in which you were around others! Make sure to wash your mask in warm water and dry on high heat- warm water and high heat laundry settings have been shown to deactivate the coronavirus. Detergent by itself can also deactivate and wash away the virus.
  • If you're using a filter insert with your mask, make sure to replace it every time you use your mask. Like disposable masks, filter inserts were meant to be single-use.
  • Wash your hands after touching your mask. This will stop you from potentially getting sick or spreading the virus around. Don't forget to wash with soap and warm water for at least 30 seconds! The more time you take to wash your hands, the more effective it will be.
  • If you aren't able to wash your mask, you can leave your mask to air out for at least a week. You'll have to wear a different mask in the meantime, but leaving your mask alone for a week will dramatically decrease the amount of coronavirus germs on it (although there are other germs that may persist longer!) Therefore, we recommend washing your mask with detergent and water, even if it's by hand.


References
  1. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/diy-cloth-face-coverings.html
  2. https://www.bmj.com/content/369/bmj.m1422.short
  3. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.01.20049528v1?ijkey=e95fe983345caa5a10c8351be7d05ad10ef5b351&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha
  4. https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public
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Life

DIY Yoga Mat Cleaner

Because when was the last time you cleaned your mat?

Yoga is a great activity to try during the pandemic. It offers a great indoor workout and the whole family can join in! There are also a ton of free yoga videos online too, so you can get top-notch instruction without leaving your house. Plus, you don't need a ton of equipment to practice yoga; all you really need is a yoga mat! Yoga mats create a layer of padding between you and the ground that makes your practice more comfortable.

Like any workout equipment, yoga mats need to be cleaned every once and a while. A clean mat will make your practice extra om-mazing! That's why we love this DIY yoga mat spray. It will keep your mat clean and smelling fresh. Plus, you probably already have these ingredients at your house! No need for an additional trip to the grocery store required.



Simply mix 1 part vinegar to 3 parts water in a glass spray bottle. You can add a few drops of tea tree or eucalyptus essential oil if you want your cleaner to have a scent! This cleaner is as easy to use as it is to make! Just spray your mat and let the cleaner completely dry.

Life

DIY Non-Toxic Hand Sanitizer

Stay protected with our easy, three ingredient sanitizer!

Making your own hand sanitizer is easier than you think! This DIY version is perfect for when you're feeling crafty or if (in a worse case scenario) you can't find hand sanitizer in stores. This three ingredient hand sanitizer will keep you protected from germs while you're on-the-go without any unnecessary or harmful ingredients. All you need is: rubbing alcohol, aloe vera gel, and essential oils (if you want some fragrance). Make sure to only use rubbing alcohol that's 90% alcohol or higher. According to the CDC, hand sanitizer has to be at least 60% alcohol to be effective. Our rubbing alcohol will be diluted a bit by the aloe vera, which is why a high alcohol percentage is needed!



⁠⁠We recommend using a spray bottle with this hand sanitizer. A squeeze bottle will work too but it'll be a little more runny.


Related Because Health Articles:

6 Non-Toxic Hand Sanitizers

8 Non-Toxic Hand Soaps

Family

Protect Your Crawling Baby From Chemicals With These 3 Tips

Have your baby safely explore their surroundings!

Once a baby starts to crawl, they're always on the move! After you've baby-proofed your outlets and stairs, it's worth considering how to keep your little one safe from harmful chemicals as well. Since babies are low to the ground when moving about and are constantly putting their hands in their mouth, they're especially at risk of exposure. Check out our top three tips on how to keep your baby safe while they're crawling and exploring!


1. Leave Shoes at the Door

Wearing shoes around the house can bring in a lot of nasty chemicals and other contaminants from the outdoors. Picture where you walk in a typical day: busy city streets, public restrooms, the back of a ride share car. Do you really want whatever is on the bottom of your shoes ending up on your carpets? As soon as you get home, take your shoes off at the door! You can even have a cute shoe storage container in your foyer so you don't forget to take them off. Leaving your shoes at the door is also a great excuse to invest in a pair of cute new slippers.


2. Vacuum More Frequently

Household dust can contain all sorts of things. Along with the usual suspects of pet hair and crumbs from breakfast, dust can contain harmful chemicals like flame retardants. Flame retardants are serious chemicals that can cause cancer and mess with our immune system. These toxic chemicals migrate out of electronics and furniture and end up around your house. Vacuuming more frequently will keep your baby safe from dust accumulating on the floor. If you're in the market for a new vacuum, we have some recommendations!


3. More Hand Washing

Washing your hands and your baby's hands is super important, even if neither of you have left the house! Babies put their hands in their mouth a LOT, especially when they're eating. And as we mentioned above, there could be a lot of gross stuff on your floor you weren't aware of. Before each meal and snack, make sure to make a pitstop at the sink to wash hands! We recommend washing hands for at least 20 seconds. Or, if you're on the go and the nearest bathroom is miles away, we have some awesome hand sanitizer recs.

Procrast-cleaning, spring-cleaning or regular ole-cleaning. Whatever it is, you're determined to clean every nook and cranny and you might just do so by scouring the grocery aisle for the strongest cleaners you can find. If you're on a roll, you might not stop until your house smells spick and span. And safe...right? When it comes to household cleaners, this is a case of stronger isn't necessarily better. The "clean" smell often associated with traditional cleaners are the result of A LOT chemicals that haven't been proven to actually clean any better. Plus, they come with their own set of health risks.
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