Everything you need to make a dorm feel like home!

Non-Toxic Target College Dorm Picks

Roundups

Starting college is so exciting for so many reasons! A new school, new friends, and new adventures are just a few weeks away. If you're going to be living in a dorm room, you've probably already started thinking about decor and living essentials. That's why we picked out some of our favorite non-toxic dorm room essentials from Target! Our picks are made from safe materials like glass, stainless steel, and organic cotton. Each cotton item is also made with OEKO-TEX guidelines, which means it's been independently tested and certified against a list of over 350 harmful chemicals.

Touchland Hand Sanitizer

Sharing a living space with a bunch of strangers can get kind of gross sometimes. That's where hand saniziter comes in! This Touchland hand sanitizer will keep germs at bay without any added fragrance.

Organic Cotton Sheet Set

Getting a good night's sleep is a crucial part of any school routine. These 400 thread count cotton sheets will have you catching ZZZs in no time! We love that they're pill and shrink resistant, and made to strict Standard 100 by OEKO-TEX guidelines.

Organic Bath Towel

This soft, organic cotton bath towel is Made in Green by OEKO-TEX and will help any dorm shower feel a little more like home.

Chunky Knit Bed Blanket

This chunky knit blanket will add some serious cozy vibes to any dorm room! It's Standard 100 by OEKO-TEX® certified and comes in a ton of cute colors.

Seventh Generation Easy Dose Laundry Detergent

This ultra-concentrated laundry detergent will keep your clothes fresh and clean without harmful chemicals found in traditional laundry detergents.

Biokleen Stain and Odor Remover

If you're a workout aficionado with lots of athletic clothes, or if you just have a neglected pile of dirty clothes in the corner of your room, this stain and odor remover is perfect for you. It gets rid of those tough, lingering odors safely and naturally without the use of harsh chemicals.

Everspring Dryer Balls

Dryer sheets can be full of harsh chemicals, which is why we love wool dryer balls instead! These dryer balls will keep your clothes static free!

Puracy Green Tea & Lime Multi Surface Cleaner

Even a dorm room needs some TLC every now and then! Clean hard surfaces with this multi-surface cleaner from Puracy. This streak-free cleaner will effectively remove dirt, grime, and residue leftover from that late night study session or post-finals party.

Lysol Power and Free Multi-Purpose Citrus Sparkle Cleaner Spray

Sometimes you needed a heavy-duty cleaner. We get it. That's why this Lysol hydrogen peroxide all-purpose cleaner is perfect for life's bigger messes. This product has an EPS design for environmental certified disinfectant, which means it was reviewed for both human health and environmental health, so you don't have to compromise on safety.

Ello Meal Prep Food Storage Container Set

That dorm room mini fridge was basically invented for leftovers. Keep your food fresh in these Ello food storage containers. Since they're made from glass instead of plastic, you can use them in the microwave without having to worry about harmful chemicals leeching into your food. Bonus: they're dishwasher safe!

Takeya 18 oz Insulated Stainless Steel Water Bottle

Students do a lot of walking while on campus, so make sure to stay hydrated with a reusable water bottle! This insulated Takeya stainless steel bottle will keep your water cool even on the hottest days.

Hamilton Beach Illuminated Glass Kettle

You don't need a kitchen to enjoy a kettle! This compact glass kettle is perfect for dorm snacks like hot chocolate, tea, or instant soup.

Contigo 16 oz Autoseal Stainless Steel Travel Mug

This stainless steel travel mug by Contigo is the perfect mug to toss in your backpack while you're on the go! It's spill and leak proof lid means you can enjoy your beverage on the go in any situation!

Home

How Safe is Borax?

A common non-toxic cleaning ingredient that may not be so harmless

For years people have recommended Borax as a safe and natural cleaning solution as an alternative to harsher traditional cleaners. It's also used a lot for other things like a non-toxic pest solution, to clean carpets, and even as an ingredient in slime for kids(1). But is Borax actually safe? Some say it is completely safe and others swear you should never use it. So we decided to do the research and figure out if Borax is a product we should be using in our everyday lives. We found that there are some issues associated with it, but there are ways it could be used safely in particular circumstances with the right precautions.

Keep reading to learn more about Borax and it's safety, as well as some alternatives you can use instead!

What is Borax?

Borax, or otherwise known as sodium borate, is a natural mineral mined from the Earth that is most commonly found as a white powder. It's most notably characterized as being a good emulsifier, preservative, and buffering agent (2). It's also known for being a great disinfectant, getting rid of stains, whitening clothes, and neutralizing hard water (2, 3). Because of these properties Borax is often found in common household products like laundry detergents, soaps, and degreasers. It's also found in topical medicine, food preservatives, pesticides, and other industrial uses because Borax can inhibit the growth of bacteria and mold, increase resistance to heat and chemicals, kill insects, and helps balance acidity (4).

Is Borax safe?

Since it is considered a natural product, it pops up in a lot of DIY recipes for various tasks around the house. However, just because it is deemed as natural that does not mean it is considered safe. Borax comes in many forms but you're most likely to handle it in its powder form for cleaning or for doing laundry. As a powder, borax has been known to be a skin and eye irritant because it can easily travel through the air and be inhaled or get in the eyes of anyone close by. Borax has also been associated with reproductive issues, endocrine disruption, and developmental issues from exposure to any of its forms (3). It's worth noting that most of these health problems were found in rats that were exposed to pretty high doses of Borax (2), so this probably means that the average person won't come into contact with enough Borax to be very dangerous, but you should still take caution when handling it in your everyday life.

It's also important to look at some of the other uses for a product when determining it's safety. In the case of Borax, one common use is as a pesticide. To kill certain pests, Borax is found as either a powder, which sticks onto the insect's body and then they ingest it from cleaning themselves, or it is mixed into food bait that the insects ingest directly. The Borax will build up in their system inhibiting their metabolism and reproductive system causing them to die. Borax is also really good at breaking down and destroying the exoskeletons of some insects because the powder is very abrasive to them (5).Obviously insects like ants are much smaller and more fragile than us, however, it is slightly concerning that Borax, a product we use relatively often in our homes, has the ability to be used as a pesticide as well.

Not only is Borax used as a pesticide, it is also used as cooling agents, adhesives, anti-freezing agents, building materials, and so many other industrial uses (2). Most of these chemicals and products are usually not associated with good human health so it is something to keep in mind when using Borax to clean around the house.

How to use Borax safely

Borax has been known to have some negative health consequences when exposed in high levels over time and lethal if ingested at high doses in animals and humans (6). Because of this it is best to limit our exposure which means that it's probably okay to be using it every once in a while, but we do not recommend using it for all of your cleaning and household purposes. If you are planning to use Borax for different tasks around the house, we found some ways you can stay safe and avoid any health issues.

  1. Keep the area where you are using Borax well ventilated by turning on a fan or opening a window.
  2. Wear long sleeves and pants to prevent any Borax from getting on your skin because it could cause irritation.
  3. If you spill any Borax on your clothes make sure to take them off right away and wash them. This goes for spilling Borax on anything, clean it up right away!
  4. Use glasses or even goggles to prevent any Borax dust from getting in your eyes.
  5. Try to keep the Borax far away from your face so you don't breathe it in. Avoiding dust is the best thing to do!
  6. Keep the Borax container tightly closed when you're not using it.
  7. Try to not use it everyday, just every once in a while.
  8. Vacuum up the floor of anywhere you used Borax in case any dust settled onto the ground.
  9. Do not ingest any Borax because it can be lethal at certain doses. This goes for children as well, keep the box out of their reach at all times (2).

Alternatives to Borax

As we mentioned, a lot of DIY cleaners and laundry detergents call for Borax. Because it can be a skin and eye irritant we wanted to give you some alternatives you could use instead if you are concerned about using it in your homemade products. We included some other homemade cleaners you can use instead, as well as some store bought all-purpose cleaners that we love!

  • Vinegar: Distilled white vinegar is a great disinfectant and deodorizer, making it a great alternative to Borax's disinfectant qualities. (7)
  • Baking soda: It is a natural and safe deodorizer, as well as, a mild abrasive that can help scrub off tough messes and stains. (7)
  • Non-chlorine bleach: Non-chlorinated bleach is a much safer alternative to the traditional bleach and is a great disinfectant.
  • Washing soda: Washing soda is a popular cleaning additive that is great for removing stains, dissolving grease, softening water, and getting rid of unpleasant smells.
  • All purpose cleaners: Instead of making something at home, check out some of the eco-friendly all purpose cleaners we love!
  • Here is a great recipe for kids slime without Borax!

Sources

  1. https://www.onegoodthingbyjillee.com/uses-for-household-borax/
  2. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/1303-96-4#section=Uses
  3. https://pharosproject.net/chemicals/2006849#hazards-panel
  4. https://www.borax.com/boron-essentials/shelter#:~:text=U.S.%20Borax%20products%20increase%20building,railway%20ties%20to%20automobile%20frames.
  5. A. Fotso Kuate, et. al. Toxicity of Amdro, Borax and Boric Acid to Anoplolepis tenella Santschi (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) 109-152. International Journal of Pest Management. https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/18234674.pdf#page=109
  6. http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/archive/borictech.html#fate
  7. https://www.zmescience.com/medicine/what-is-borax-and-is-it-safe-432432/
Want an easy way to live healthier?
Sign up for our newsletter! Curated environmental health news delivered to your inbox every three weeks.
By submitting above, you agree to our privacy policy.
/ SOCIAL
Home

A Guide to Non-Toxic Laundry Stripping

For truly softer and cleaner laundry

By now, you've probably heard of laundry stripping. With a viral TikTok video and lots of articles and videos showing the dirty water that gets left behind, we were ready to give it a try! But, most of the laundry stripping recipes call for ingredients that have synthetic fragrances, dyes, preservatives, and fluorescent brighteners. Not only are these chemicals unnecessary, but they can be irritating to the skin and disrupt your hormones. That's why we decided to come up with a non-toxic and natural laundry stripping recipe that doesn't negatively affect our health and will still give us that satisfaction of seeing all of the dirt coming off our clothes and towels!

What is Laundry Stripping?

So why do we need to strip our laundry? Over time our clothes and linens can get buildup from things like hard water, detergents, fabric softeners, body oils, and sweat that don't wash out completely in a normal washing cycle. So the process of laundry stripping aims at removing all of those built up residues and reviving your laundry so that it's softer and actually clean. Have towels that feel crunchy and not as absorbent as they used to be? That build up that is potentially the reason why! If you have had your towels for a while, you may not even realize how much crispier they have gotten!

In order for laundry stripping to be effective there are key ingredients you need to have. The first is washing soda, which is not baking soda, but it is a popular cleaning additive that is great for removing stains, dissolving grease, softening water, and getting rid of unpleasant smells (1). The next ingredient, hydrogen peroxide (in liquid or powdered form), is a great disinfectant, brightener, and deodorizer that gets rid of all of the bacteria that might be stuck in between the fibers of your clothes (2). And if you have hard water, sodium citrate should definitely be added to your recipe because it is great at dissolving minerals and other build up from hard water (3). Finally you need powdered laundry detergent which contains surfactants and other enzymes that help break down most residue that is left on your clothes (4).

Based on our laundry stripping tests, we highly recommend you try it out! Doing this didn't get rid of the slight pink tinge on one of the towels from when I washed it with something red, so it's magical abilities are limited. But the water was completely filthy, just like in that viral video, our towels and sheets were softer and more absorbent, almost like they were new again! It definitely gave them a refresh and extended their life. So try out these different recipes to see which one works best for your laundry. We promise seeing the dirty water in your tub is totally worth it!

Keep reading to check out some of the recipes we tested for non-toxic laundry stripping!

Laundry Stripping recipes

For all of these recipes you want to fill your bathtub or top loading washing machine with the hottest water possible, just enough to cover your clothes or whatever else you may be stripping. Once the clothes are covered with water, mix in all of the ingredients until they are fully dissolved. The next step is to wait! After adding the ingredients, come and check on your clothes every hour and give them a little stir. Most people leave their clothes in the water until it gets completely cold, but if you have really dirty clothes you may want to leave them in the water for about 5 to 6 hours. Finally once you take your clothes out, the last step is to give them a wash in the washing machine!

Laundry Stripping with Borax

¼ cup borax

¼ cup washing soda

¼ cup sodium citrate (optional for hard water)

1 scoop non-toxic laundry detergent powder

There are a lot of conflicting opinions on whether or not Borax is a non-toxic ingredient. Check out this article on Borax to judge for yourself if you want to use it!

Laundry Stripping with Brightening Boost

1 cup hydrogen peroxide or ¼ cup Branch Basics Oxygen Boost or Molly's Suds Oxygen Whitener (both contain sodium percarbonate, which is like powdered hydrogen peroxide)

¼ cup washing soda

1 scoop non-toxic laundry detergent powder

Some powdered laundry detergents we recommend

Since the regular powdered laundry detergent that gets recommended for stripping is full of harsh chemicals, we wanted to recommend some cleaner options that you could use instead!

a) Molly's Suds Laundry Powder b) Grab Green 3-in-1 laundry detergent powder c) Charlie's soap laundry powder d) Seventh Generation Natural Laundry detergent powder e) Meliora Cleaning Products Laundry Powder f) Biokleen free and clear laundry powder

Sources

  1. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/10340#section=Uses
  2. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Hydrogen-peroxide
  3. https://thechemco.com/chemical/sodium-citrate/
  4. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/laundry-stripping-recipe-borax_l_5f72566dc5b6e99dc3310b4a

Laundry isn't our favorite thing to do, but unless you're super fancy and have someone else do your washing, it's just a part of life. The one good thing about doing laundry is that fresh laundry straight out of the dryer. The smell, the softness, the warmth… it's basically happiness in fabric form! The many different types of laundry detergent scents like spring meadow and mountain breeze seem like an added bonus too. But, have you ever wondered how companies actually make these scents? It turns out laundry detergent scents can have hidden health hazards. Read on to learn more about laundry fragrance and our non-toxic alternatives!

Reasons to Avoid Fragrance

One of the best parts of laundry detergent is it's smell. That clean, fresh scent is so popular that people try to recreate it in candle form! As much as we love scented laundry, traditional products can be pretty harmful. Companies can use dozens (or hundreds!) of different chemicals to create their fragrances. According to the International Fragrance Association's Transparency List, there are approximately 3,000 fragrance ingredients that can be used in consumer goods worldwide. And since the FDA does not require approval before a chemical goes onto the market, it's impossible to say that all of these fragrance ingredients are safe to use. Oftentimes some of those chemicals are phthalates. Phthalates can help fragrance last longer but they're also known endocrine disruptors with harmful health effects.

Companies also don't have to tell you exactly what goes into their fragrance formulations. Since fragrance is considered a trade secret, companies can hide the exact chemicals they use. You'll only see "fragrance" listed on the ingredient list, despite there being tons of chemicals that go into it. Luckily, some states are taking steps to undo the mystery around fragrance ingredients. In California, manufacturers will soon have to disclose all fragrance and flavor ingredients in their products and any known health hazards associated with those ingredients.

On top of everything else, some fragrance ingredients can trigger migraines or skin irritation in people with sensitivities or allergies. They may not even know which specific ingredient they're sensitive to because of the trade secret rules! Babies and children are especially susceptible to fragrance sensitivities.

Non toxic Ways to Get Clothes Smelling Fresh

First off, we really need to redefine what "clean" smells like. All our lives we've been trained to believe that clean = really strong fragrance. Who else has been overwhelmed by scent when they walked down the laundry aisle?! Clean clothes can be clean and just smell like warm clothes without the super flowery scent. And all those synthetic fragrances are often there to just cover up odors. They don't actually remove funky smells and grime on your clothes.If you're looking for a way to really deep clean clothes, check out our laundry stripping article.

That's a good place to start to get really clean clothes without funky odors.

If laundry stripping seems like too much work, there are also a ton of easy ways to help your clothes smell fresh without added chemicals. Below are some of our favorite ways to add scent to your laundry that are natural but also smell amazing!

  1. Create a mixture of 2 cup of salt with 20 drops of essential oil in a jar. Scoop 2 tbsp directly into your washing machine with your laundry and run the cycle like normal.
  2. Add a drop or two of essential oil to a wool dryer ball. This will help keep clothes soft and smelling fresh! If you don't have a dryer ball you can also use a damp washcloth.
  3. Vinegar is a great way to neutralize odors! Just put some vinegar into your fabric softener tray and it'll work to remove any funky scents.
  4. Switch to non toxic laundry detergent, dryer sheets, and fabric softeners that use safe scents. Our roundups offer a ton of product recommendations!
Home

How to Naturally Deep Clean Your Laundry Machine

Non-toxic cleaning methods for different types of washing machines

Have you been noticing that your clothes smell a little funny or there is a bad smell coming from your laundry room? Or maybe there are some green spots around the door of your washing machine? Well it might be time to clean your washing machine! If you search up conventional ways of cleaning your washing machine, many times those methods call for bleach and other harsh chemicals that can cause harm to our environment and our health. Instead of using harsh chemicals to clean your washing machine, try out a few of the methods we recommend that use safe and natural cleaners!

Three ways to clean your washing machine

1. Vinegar and baking soda

Vinegar is a strong acid that works really well to dissolve mineral deposits, dirt, grease, grime, and can even kill bacteria. And baking soda is a great deodorizer and works as a gentile abrasive to help get rid of hard water grime.

Top loader:

  1. Turn your washing machine to the hottest and longest cycle. Then add four cups of distilled white vinegar and let the cycle run for about a minute.
  2. After a minute or until the vinegar is mixed with the water, stop the cycle and let the water sit for about an hour.
  3. While you wait, it's time to tackle the rest of the washing machine. Take a cloth and some vinegar and wipe down the lid and the outside of the washer.
  4. It's also a good time to clean the seal if your top loader has one. Take some straight vinegar and pour it directly into the seal and scrub until all the mold or mildew comes out. For some extra disinfection and a great smell, you can mix 10 drops of an essential oil, like lemon or eucalyptus, with the vinegar to clean the seal.
  5. Once that first cycle is completely over, restart the cycle and pour a cup of baking soda into the drum. Once the second cycle is complete leave the lid open to completely dry the drum (1).

Front loader:

  1. Start by cleaning the seal using straight white vinegar. Feel free to add drops of essential oils like lemon or eucalyptus oil for a great smell and some added disinfection.
  2. Scrub all of the mold, soap scum, and possibly hair out of that seal. Make sure you pull it all the way back so you can clean every inch!
  3. Start your hottest cycle and then pour 2 cups of vinegar into the detergent dispenser.
  4. Once that cycle is finished start another cycle by putting ½ cup of baking soda in the drum and running the same hot water cycle.
  5. Finally wash the outside of the washing machine with vinegar and a cloth and use vinegar to scrub and clean out the detergent tray (1).
  6. Leave the door open to let the drum fully dry out.

If you are concerned that vinegar can damage the seal of your washing machine, you can either dilute the vinegar or completely rinse off the seal with a wet cloth to avoid any potential corrosion. If you are still not sure about using vinegar, check out one of the other methods we recommend!

2. Non chlorinated bleach

Non-chlorinated bleach is a much safer alternative to the traditional bleach. It doesn't contain chlorine which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs (5). This type of bleach is still a great disinfectant so this might be a great solution if your washer has a lot of mold or mildew buildup. We love the brand seventh generation non-chlorine bleach!

Top loader:

  1. Select the hottest and longest cycle and pour ¾ cup of non-chlorinated bleach into the drum and run the cycle for one minute. Open the lid to let the water/bleach sit in the drum for about an hour. Then complete the cycle.
  2. Clean the outside of the machine using a mixture of water and bleach or a non-toxic all purpose cleaner and use a cloth to wipe down the outside.
  3. If your top loader has a seal, pour a small amount of the non-chlorinated bleach and scrub all of the gunk out and make sure to wipe it out until it's dry (2).
  4. Leave the lid open to let the drum fully dry out.

Front loader:

  1. To clean the door seal, pour some bleach straight on the seal and scrub all of the mold and stains off. Pull the seal all the way back to get all of the gunk out!
  2. Using a mixture of water and bleach or an non-toxic all purpose cleaner, use a cloth to wipe down the outside and also scrub out the detergent tray to get rid of all of the residue and mold.
  3. Next select the hottest and longest cycle and pour ¾ cup of non-chlorinated bleach into the detergent tray and run the cycle (2).
  4. Leave the door open to let the drum fully dry out.

3. Washing soda

Washing soda is a popular cleaning additive that is great for removing stains, dissolving grease, softening water, and getting rid of unpleasant smells. It's definitely worth picking some of this up! We love the brand Arm & Hammer Super Washing Soda!

For both washer types:

  1. Dissolve some washing soda in some hot water and scrub the seal if you have one. If you have a really dirty seal, try using one of the other methods after you scrub and rinse off the washing soda, which helps to loosen some of the grime..
  2. Select the hottest and longest cycle and pour 2 cups of washing soda into the drum and run the cycle.
  3. Make sure to clean the rest of the washing machine by dissolving some washing soda in water and wiping it down with a cloth (3).

Tips for keeping a clean washing machine

  1. Keep the lids/doors open always so the moisture can dry.
  2. After the seal is cleaned, you can help prevent mold growth by wiping the seal down with a non-toxic all purpose cleaner weekly. This will prevent mold and grime from building up!
  3. To clean a fabric softener dispenser, pour boiling water on it and scrub until all of the built up residue is gone. For a non-toxic fabric softener option, check out some of the brands we recommend!
  4. Switching to powdered laundry detergent has been known to reduce the smell coming for your laundry machine. Bonus, powdered laundry detergent does not contain preservatives like liquid laundry detergent. Check out some of the brands we recommend!

Sources

  1. https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-washing-machine-with-vinegar
  2. https://cleanmama.com/how-to-naturally-clean-any-washing-machine/#:~:text=Add%20%C2%BE%20cup%20of%20white,a%202nd%20rinse%20cycle%20selection.
  3. https://laundrapp.com/blog/how-to-clean-your-washing-machine/#:~:text=To%20use%20soda%20crystals%20to,with%20a%20clean%2C%20fresh%20machine.
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK441921/

Sigh… we're spending a lot more time at home nowadays. And for some reason everything seems a lot dirtier than usual and we feel like we're cleaning 24/7. That's why we've been doing a ton of research into cleaning tricks and hacks! One subject that has come up over and over again is microfiber cloths.

Microfiber cloths have been our best friends these past couple of months, not only for dust bunnies but to make sure things are extra germ free during the coronavirus pandemic. If you don't know about microfiber cloths, listen up! These magic cleaning cloths really do work well and have been scientifically shown to reduce germs and cross contamination between surfaces (which is an especially good idea nowadays!). There's even a clever way to fold them to create 8 unique cleaning surfaces per cloth. Basically, they're amazing! Read on to learn why it's a good idea to clean with microfiber cloths, especially during a pandemic, and how to use and wash them the right way.

What Are Microfiber Cloths?

Microfiber is a special kind of extra soft and fuzzy fabric made of polyester and nylon super fine fibers that have a diameter of less than ten micrometres. That's a hundred times finer than human hair and even finer than silk fibers! Microfiber cloths and mop heads are widely used because these super fine fibers are really good at cleaning, even without any cleaning products. Millions of tiny fibers on a cloth have a slightly positive charge that actually attract dirt and dust (which are negatively charged) and dislodge them from surfaces. That's why when you dust with a microfiber cloth, it almost seems like it swoops up the dust particles without any resistance. And because the super fine fibers increase the surface area, microfiber cloths can absorb 7 times their weight in water, which is also really useful when cleaning up messes. The tiny fibers are also able to get into cracks and crevessaes, which also contributes to their superpower cleaning abilities.

Why it's a Good Idea to Clean with Microfiber Cloths During the Coronavirus Pandemic

All of these properties of microfiber cloths that make them really good at cleaning up dirt and grime, also make them an excellent choice for cleaning during the coronavirus pandemic. Studies have shown that microfiber cloths reduce the transfer of germs from surface to surface as compared to cotton cloths (1). Another study showed microfiber mops remove more germs from a surface without a disinfectant than a cotton mop did with a disinfectant (2). That's some super power! Microfiber cloths also dry fast, so there's less chance for bacteria growth if you don't immediately put them in the laundry.

Since microfiber cloths are so effective at cleaning on their own, this means that you can clean your house using less harsh cleaning products. Since cleaning products have been shown to reduce indoor air quality and damage lungs (3), anything that reduces their use is a good idea. Indoor air quality, lung health, and overall wellness are so important during the coronavirus pandemic.

Finally, the fact that microfiber cloths make cleaning much easier means that you're more likely to do it. Having a clean home and disinfecting when necessary are really important during the pandemic. In fact, the CDC recommends cleaning a surface before disinfecting; this combination is the best way to reduce the risk of infection. Dirt and grime can actually make some disinfectants not work properly and cleaning actually physically removes germs and dirt from surfaces or objects.

How to Use Microfiber Cloths the Right Way

Knowing the correct way to use a microfiber cloth is crucial for maximum cleaning potential. It's important to keep microfiber cloths dry when you are dusting. That allows the static electricity to work the best at attracting dust. For other surfaces that need a bit of water or all purpose cleaner, don't over saturate the surface or cloth. It's also a good idea to color code your cloths for different uses (even more important if they are being used at schools or other facilities). This reduces the cross contamination risk even after you wash them. You don't want to accidentally clean your kitchen with a cloth you used on your toilet! And while you're cleaning, folding the cloths in half and then in half again and then using each side for a different surface is a great way to reduce cross contamination. You can get 8 separate surfaces this way! See our handy video or follow the instructions below.


How to Fold a Microfiber Cloth to Reduce Surface Contamination
  1. Fold the microfiber cloth in half, and then in half again. A quarter of the cloth should be exposed now.
  2. Hold the cloth in your hand and clean your first surface, like the dining room table.
  3. Flip the cloth in your hand and use the other side to clean the next surface, for example counters.
  4. Unfold the cloth and then refold it the other way, and use the two remaining surfaces on this side of the cloth.
  5. Unfold the cloth completely and then fold the cloth in half so that the non-used side is exposed. Then fold it in half again. Repeat steps 2-4 on the unused side of the cloth.

How to Wash Microfiber Cloths the Right Way

Microfiber cloths can be washed in the washing machine using warm or cold water, and can be reused many many times. However, if you wash them with cotton cloths or your normal clothes, the fibers can get gunked up with stuff that will make them less effective. It's a good idea to create a separate laundry basket for your microfiber cloths and wash them alone. Make sure to avoid using fabric softeners and bleach when laundering microfiber cloths because they can damage the fibers. Microfiber cloths also dry very quickly, so hang them to dry, or dry them on low in your dryer.

What About Microfiber Pollution from Microfiber Cloths?

Perhaps you have heard about the microfiber pollution problem? If you haven't, basically little microfibers (which are essentially plastic) are being released into our rivers and oceans through our laundry (4)! Fleece and lots of other clothing contain synthetic fibers, which can shed while they're being washed. While this is a problem that scientists are just beginning to discover and understand, we do know that they can cause hazardous effects in aquatic species. We don't know much about the human health effects yet, but scientists are working on it. Washing and using microfiber cloths does contribute to microfiber pollution, but they probably contribute less than everything else you wash. Since microfiber cloths reduce harsh cleaning chemical use and are more reusable and durable than cotton cloths, we still recommend them. Purchasing one less fleece or clothing item with synthetic fibers can offset the couple of microfiber cloths you need for cleaning your entire home! To reduce the potential for shedding, you can buy some microfiber trapping devices like the Cora ball and the Guppyfriend bag and use those when you are washing your microfiber cloths.


References

  1. Trajtman, Adriana N., Kanchana Manickam, and Michelle J. Alfa. "Microfiber cloths reduce the transfer of Clostridium difficile spores to environmental surfaces compared with cotton cloths." American Journal of Infection Control 43.7 (2015): 686-689.
  2. Rutala, William A., Maria F. Gergen, and David J. Weber. "Microbiologic evaluation of microfiber mops for surface disinfection." American journal of infection control 35.9 (2007): 569-573.
  3. Svanes, Øistein, et al. "Cleaning at home and at work in relation to lung function decline and airway obstruction." American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine197.9 (2018): 1157-1163.
  4. Mishra, Sunanda, Chandi charan Rath, and Alok Prasad Das. "Marine microfiber pollution: a review on present status and future challenges." Marine pollution bulletin 140 (2019): 188-197.

When it comes to fragrance, we always say that the safest option is to look for products that are completely fragrance free. Choosing to go fragrance-free is a great way to avoid chemicals that may be harmful to your health. Plus, does everything we own really need to smell like cotton candy?! In case you haven't heard why fragrance is so problematic, we break it down below.

What's Actually in Fragrance?

One of the big problems with fragrance is that there are so many different chemicals that can be added to a product. According to the International Fragrance Association's Transparency List, there are approximately 3,000 fragrance ingredients that can be used in consumer goods worldwide (1). And since the FDA does not require approval before a chemical goes onto the market, it's impossible to say that all of these fragrance ingredients are safe to use. The chemical that's making your house smell like clean laundry or a cinnamon apple might also secretly be toxic.

Even though there are a lot of untested chemicals, we do know that some fragrance ingredients are definitely harmful to human health. Many fragrance ingredients can be allergens that cause headaches, runny noses, sneezing, or coughing (2). Allergens are probably the reason you have to stand two feet away from that one coworker who wears a super strong perfume.

Phthalates are widely used in as a solvent or fixative in perfume, shampoo, lotion, and nail polish even though they're endocrine disrupting chemicals. Fragrance found in candles has been shown to contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) like formaldehyde and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), both of which can cause short-term health effects like irritation, and long-term health effects like cancer (3, 4).

To make matters worse, companies don't even have to tell you all the ingredients they use in their fragrance! Trade secret laws keep companies from disclosing proprietary fragrance blends, but that means we don't actually know what's in our products. There could be 10 ingredients that go into the "fragrance" listed on your body lotion, or there could be 500! And if we don't know what all of these ingredients are, how do we adequately protect our health?

When in Doubt, Go With Fragrance Free

Like we mentioned before, the best bet is to purchase products that are free from all fragrance. Only look for labels that say "contains no added fragrance"... some products labeled as "unscented" may still contain fragrance as a way to hide ingredients that naturally have an unpleasant smell (2). If you really can't live without a fragranced product, go for something that only uses essential oils (although they have their own pros and cons as well).


References
  1. https://ifrafragrance.org/initiatives/transparency/ifra-transparency-list
  2. https://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/cosmetic-ingredients/fragrances-cosmetics
  3. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0304389414010243
  4. https://toxtown.nlm.nih.gov/chemicals-and-contaminants/polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbons-pahs
Roundups

Non-Toxic Fabric Softener and Dryer Sheets

Natural dryer sheets and dryer sheet alternatives

Updated for 2019!

You know when you are doing laundry and everything comes out of the dryer all warm and fluffy and smelling amazing and you just fall asleep in a pile of clean clothes on the couch? Nope, just us? Oh well. While that might not be a common practice, throwing in a dryer sheet or adding a splash of fabric softener is pretty common. But, have you ever wondered how one of those rather small dryer sheets works to get rid of the static for a whole load of laundry? Are dryer sheets toxic? Are there alternatives to dryer sheets and fabric softeners?

Well, it turns out that dryer sheets often come with many added chemicals that you might not want all over your clothes. Next time you are doing a load of laundry (with some safe laundry detergent), check out one of these option instead. They will keep your clothes looking good without the potentially dangerous chemicals. All of the ones we recommend are widely available, have positive reviews, and have been checked for safety from a third party. Who wouldn't want a more natural dryer sheet?! We also have a suggestion for our favorite alternative to dryer sheets, wool dryer balls.


non-toxic dryer sheets and fabric softeners

a) Ecover Fabric Softener b) Method Dryer Sheets in Beach Sage c) Kintor Wool Dryer Balls d) Attitude Fabric Softener e) The Honest Company Dryer Cloths f) Attitude Reusable Static Eliminator and Softener g) Seventh Generation Natural Fabric Softener Sheets


We rely on EWG's consumer databases, the Think Dirty App, and GoodGuide in addition to consumer reviews and widespread availability of products to generate these recommendations. Learn more on our methodology page.

*Because Health is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program so that when you click through our Amazon links, a percentage of the proceeds from your purchases will go to Because Health. We encourage you to shop locally, but if you do buy online buying through our links will help us continue the critical environmental health education work we do. Our participation does not influence our product recommendations. To read more about how we recommend products, go to our methodology page.

Want an easy way to live healthier?
Sign up for our newsletter! Curated environmental health news delivered to your inbox every three weeks.
By submitting above, you agree to our privacy policy.
/ SOCIAL