Life

Summer Recap: Here's What's Up with Wildfires

i.e. another way climate change is screwing with our health

Remember how bad the wildfires in the western United States were this year? Maybe you're worried that summer is never going to be the same with the constant air quality warnings? If you're like most people, you're probably a little concerned. And rightfully so! For instance, even if you weren't in California during the wildfires this year, you might have still felt the effects of the wildfires. While it doesn't seem the most direct, wildfires that occur far away still affect the environment you are living in. Climate change is playing a huge role in the number of wildfires and the length of the wildfire season that we're seeing and will be seeing - here's why.

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Life

How to Avoid Summer’s Itchiest Pests

The Bugs & Plants Love Climate Change

Summer's officially here, and after some crazy winter weather, we are more than ready to pack up the camping gear for a weekend in the woods or head to the park for a picnic. As we humans keep putting more global warming gases into the air, there's no doubt - it's gettin' weird out there. Did you hear about that day when it was nearly 100 degrees and then snowed two days later ... in Oklahoma? Or when Hawaii got 50 inches of rain in just 24 hours? How about the tick that can make you allergic to meat? While the winters have been crazy, they're also getting shorter and that's changing the way we live, work, and play every day - especially when it comes to the bugs and plants around us. The weird weather stories may grab headlines, but it's the subtle changes around your home that can affect your health. Here's what you need to know about how climate change is making pests and plants more pesky and what you can do to protect yourself and your family.

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With Memorial Day in our rearview mirrors, it officially means it's time to break out the BBQ. While that may mean more time at the beach, or in the park, you might have noticed it's been heating up for a few weeks already. Hate to break it to you, but more summer isn't necessarily a good thing - - thanks, climate change! In fact, since scientists first started recording summer temperatures in 1895, the planet has heated up almost 1.5 degrees °F. This may not sound like much, but if you were running a fever of 100 degrees (as opposed to your normal 98.6), you would be concerned about your health. It's the same for the planet. Most of the warming has occurred in the last 50 years, and, 2017 marked the third hottest year on record with more frequent and longer heat waves, plus increased humidity. New parts of the United States that have never seen spurts of crazy temperatures before are feeling the heat - think Portland, summer 2017 that hit temps in the triple digits. Scientists are even predicting Boston could feel more like Florida by the end of the century! Florida is great sometimes, but New Englanders still love their white winters.

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