BPA is not being used anymore, but what do we know about the new liners?

Is Canned Food Safe from BPA Now?

Food

When it’s 7pm and you haven’t thought about dinner yet, heating up a can of chunky stew or throwing a can of beans into a cheesy burrito sounds like the best idea ever. By now, you’ve probably heard about BPA in canned foods, but many cans now say “BPA-free” on them. Hurray for that, right?! Every can still needs a thin liner inside so that the food doesn’t corrode the metal from the inside out. So if they are not made with BPA, what are these new liners made of? And does it mean that canned foods are safer to eat now?

What is BPA?

BPA, or bisphenol A, is a chemical that is often used in plastics to make them clear and strong. It is also in epoxy resins that can line water pipes and food cans, and is used in receipt paper (1). Although BPA is the most well-known bisphenol, there are dozens of other bisphenols (often called BPA replacements) out there that are chemically similar to BPA.

BPA is one of the better known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). These chemicals look like and act like hormones in the body, which confuse the endocrine system and cause disruption of its normal functions. Since the endocrine system is responsible for metabolism, growth and development, reproduction, and so much more, scientists are finding out more every day about the harmful health effects of EDCs.

BPA in Canned food

Canned food has been around for a long time and since the 1960’s, a thin epoxy lining made with the chemical BPA has been used to protect the inside of the can from corroding. Corroding metal is not good, so a liner is definitely needed in order for canned food to have a good shelf life.

There were two problems though. First, more and more studies piled up showing the harmful endocrine disrupting effects of BPA (2). Secondly, many studies showed that BPA moves from the can lining into the food that is eaten, and that things like acidity, heat, and fat affected how much BPA ended up being in the food (3,4). As a result, there was more and more pressure to remove BPA from can linings.

In fact, reports have shown that there has been a decline in can linings with BPA. The Center for Environmental Health found a huge decline from 2017 to 2019 in canned foods that had BPA linings. In 2019, their tests showed that about 95% of cans tested free of BPA. In fact, the Can Manufactuer’s Institute reports that their industry statistics indicate that more than 95% of all U.S. food can production has transitioned out of BPA to alternative liners (5).

New Canned Food Linings

It’s clear that canned food has largely moved away from BPA, but what are they using in new can linings? That part is less clear. The new linings are made from either acrylic, polyester, non-BPA epoxies, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) copolymers, or olefin polymers. Which one depends on the manufacturer. A 2016 report by several nonprofit groups Buyer Beware: Toxic BPA and regrettable substitutes in the linings of canned food notes that many of these new linings are not great alternatives. PVC is not a great substitute because it’s made from vinyl chloride, a known carcinogen. And many of the acrylic linings include polystyrene (hello styrofoam!), which is also a possible human carcinogen. Adequate testing to ensure that these new linings are safe for food have not been done. And it’s probably no surprise that neither PVC or polystyrene are great for the environment!

Even some of the newest liners, like olefin polymers, which are partially derived from plants, have not been completely studied for safety, many times because their formulation is not publicly available.

Moreover, there are only a couple of companies that specify exactly which BPA free liner they have moved to. So, if you see a can with a BPA free symbol on it, you won’t know what they are using instead.

The Bottom Line on BPA in Canned Food

So the bottom line is that yes, canned foods are largely safe from BPA now thanks to the voices of countless consumers and health advocates. But there is more work to be done to ensure that canned foods linings that are used today are safe. Here’s what you can do to best protect your health:

  1. Write to companies and ask them what linings they use on their canned food products and ask them to show you safety data.
  2. Buy frozen produce and fruits. Food is frozen before it is packaged and frozen food packaging is generally made of safer plastics.
  3. Explore canned food alternatives such as glass jars and Tetra-paks.
  4. Shop the bulk and dry goods bins and make staples like beans from scratch. Freeze small portions in the freezer for easy accessibility in the future.


References

  1. https://www.niehs.nih.gov/health/topics/agents/sya-bpa/index.cfm
  2. Rubin, Beverly S. "Bisphenol A: an endocrine disruptor with widespread exposure and multiple effects." The Journal of steroid biochemistry and molecular biology 127.1-2 (2011): 27-34.
  3. Sungur, Şana, Muaz Köroğlu, and Abdo Özkan. "Determinatıon of bisphenol a migrating from canned food and beverages in markets." Food chemistry 142 (2014): 87-91.
  4. Hartle, Jennifer C., Ana Navas-Acien, and Robert S. Lawrence. "The consumption of canned food and beverages and urinary Bisphenol A concentrations in NHANES 2003–2008." Environmental research 150 (2016): 375-382.
  5. https://www.cancentral.com/content/innovations-foo...
Family

Mix 'N Match Snack Ideas with Zero Packaging

Run out of tasty snacks? We've got you

It can be hard to find healthy snacks you can give to your kids (or even for yourself). That's why we put together a bunch of snack combos that will help your kids get their daily intake of fruits, veggies, proteins, and fats without artificial flavorings and refined sugars. All of the combos are super easy to put together and require little to no cooking. Plus mixing the different colors and textures of the different foods is sure to make snack time more exciting for little kids and even the pickiest of eaters! These snacks are a great way to avoid packaged snacks which means less waste and chemicals getting into our kids food. If you are struggling to find nutritious snacks for your kids or even a way to change up your own diet, check out this graphic of awesome snack combos!

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We've all heard that reducing meat consumption is a great way to combat climate change, but for many people giving up meat completely is just really hard. That's why we're all for meals that reduce meat, but don't give it up completely. Just eating less meat on a consistent basis can have a big impact on carbon emissions and plant rich diets are really good for your heart health too. Adding veggies into ground beef tacos is one of our favorite ways to do that. This recipe is super kid-friendly and doesn't sacrifice on taste; it will definitely become a go-to recipe that everyone will gobble up. It's also budget friendly because it can stretch a pound of ground beef to last two meals. Sounds almost too good to be true, right?!

This recipe is also great for using up any veggies that are languishing in the fridge. Here we use onion, celery, zucchinis, and kale, but most veggies will work in this recipe. Broccoli stems, wilted leafy greens, leftover bell pepper, and even eggplant and mushrooms will work in this recipe. By using up what you have, you're reducing food waste, which is another way to combat climate change. So give this recipe a try the next time Taco Tuesday rolls around!

Ground Beef Loaded with Veggies Recipe

Ingredients

Ground beef tacos that include veggies like onion, celery, zucchinis, kale, broccoli stems, wilted leafy greens, leftover bell pepper, eggplant and mushrooms

For the Filling

  • 1 lb Ground Beef
  • ½ onion
  • 1 stalk celery
  • 3 small zucchinis (or 2 medium)
  • 1 bunch kale or other leafy green
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • ½ tsp chili powder (or sub taco seasoning mix for all spices)
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • Salt and pepper

For the Tacos

  • Flour or corn tortillas or hard taco shells
  • Garnishes like avocado, salsa, shredded cheese, sliced radishes, shredded lettuce, sour cream, pickled onions

Instructions

  1. Finely chop or food process onion, celery, zucchinis, and kale. You can use any other vegetables that you have in the refrigerator. Broccoli, swiss chard, cabbage, mushrooms all work well.
  2. Heat 1 Tbsp olive oil in a skillet and add vegetables. Cook over medium high heat, stirring frequently until the veggies have lost most of their water content. Depending on the moisture in the veggies you used, this may take anywhere from 5-15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Remove veggies from the skillet and set aside.
  3. Add ground beef to the skillet and break up with a spatula. Add garlic, cumin, coriander, and chili powder. Feel free to change the amount of chili powder so that it's more spicy or less spicy depending on your preference. You can also substitute some taco seasoning mix if you have that on hand. Season with salt and pepper as well.
  4. When the ground beef is browned evenly, add the veggies back into the skillet and mix with your spatula until the mixture is well combined.
  5. Serve in heated tortillas with any garnishes you may have. Leftover filling is also really good in quesadillas, as a side to a big salad, or as part of a scramble.
Home

Victory Garden Revival!

Easily grow produce at your home

We've got some free time on our hands now that we're staying at home all the time and going to the grocery store can be really stressful. Plus, many grocery stores have had trouble keeping fresh produce in stock during the pandemic. Why not start growing your own produce?!

We've seen a revival of "victory gardens" in recent months as a way to reliably get fruit and veggies. Growing your own produce is rewarding, fun, and a great educational tool for kids! Plus, a backyard garden is organic! You also don't have to have a large backyard to create your own victory garden. Many plants can be grown in containers. A lot of nurseries and gardening stores are still open during the pandemic. Make sure to call ahead to confirm store hours and see if you can do curbside delivery.

The Farmer's Almanac is a great, in-depth resource for all of your gardening needs. It's recent article on the revival of victory gardens in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic provides a lot of important information.

Below are some fruit and vegetables we wanted to highlight that are great for beginners. If you feel like you need some extra help, you can always contact your state's master gardener! Master gardeners are especially knowledgeable about what will grow in your area, how to keep your plants alive, and unique gardening challenges your area might face.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are a hardy vegetable that love full sun. They're a super versatile ingredient used in so many different recipes. You can't go wrong with tomatoes! They're easy to grow in a container or in a sunny spot in your backyard with loamy soil. Tomatoes take about 60-80 days to mature, so plant in early spring! Read more about growing tomatoes here.

Herbs

A great option for apartment dwellers. You can grow herbs in small pots in a sunny windowsill. You can also plant herbs in containers and keep them on your porch. Growing your own herbs is super convenient when a recipe only calls for a few leaves or a small amount of an ingredient. You can just snip off what you need from your own plants instead of bulk buying at the grocery store! We love mint, chive, rosemary, or thyme. Check out more tips on growing herbs here.


Cucumbers

Another great container plant! We recommend getting a vining cucumber to plant in a container, just remember to also include a trellis! Cucumbers love hot weather and lots of water, and they'll grow quickly as long as they're receiving plenty of both! Cucumbers make a great addition to any salad or even as a cocktail garnish (we won't judge!). More info can be found here.


Green Beans

Like cucumbers, green beans are compact, productive, and easy to grow! Pole beans will need a trellis, but bush beans don't need extra support. Beans love full sun and will reach maturity in 50-65 days. Try green beans in a stir fry or as a tasty side dish! Get started growing green beans with this helpful guide.


Raspberries

Unlike many other plants, raspberries will do well in a partially-shady location. They need well-drained soil and protection from the elements to thrive. Water regularly and be prepared to eat some very tasty berries! We think home-grown berries taste exceptionally better than store bought berries. Learn more about growing raspberries here.


Strawberries

You'll be amazed by how much better home-grown strawberries taste than store bought. Strawberries are a little more finicky than other plants, but they'll thrive in full sun and well-drained soil. Check out this comprehensive guide to growing strawberries before your next gardening session!

It's good to know eating organic actually works. It's good for you and the environment!⁣ ⁣ To help you at the grocery store, our favorite trick for prioritizing what organic produce to buy is LEAFY (kale, spinach, lettuce), BERRY (all the berries), SKINS (anything you eat the skins of like apples, tomatoes, eggplant...etc). Leafy, berry, skins!⁣ .⁣ .⁣ .⁣
Dreaming of starting up a garden this year? Before you start planting, it's a good idea to check if your soil is contaminated with lead. And if it is (or you're not sure) bringing in new safe topsoil (6-12 inches) and creating raised beds is a good way to go. Some veggies like tomatoes, beans, and zucchini are also less likely to absorb heavy metals, so those are good bets too. Read more tips like this in our article on soil and gardening.⁣ .⁣ .⁣ .⁣
How about one that gives you food? Even if you don't have a backyard, you can grow some vegetables and herbs on a windowsill inside. We found 9 veggies and herbs that are easy to grow inside and useful to have on hand. It's a great way to cut down on food waste and unnecessary plastic packaging, and realize your dreams of running a farm-to-table kitchen.⁣ .⁣ .⁣ .⁣
Want an easy way to live healthier?
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