So, today, we are sharing 6 super easy things you can do that will help you limit your (and your family's) lead exposure. They are all super easy and require little to no money investment at all. Use a door mat and take your shoes off at the door. This is also a great excuse to get those cozy slippers you've been eyeing. Mop your floors. Okay, this is not super fun, but even just moping a couple times more a month than you normally do greatly reduces the amount of lead that just sort of collects in the dust around your home. Wipe down surfaces with a wet microfiber cloth. It catches more than a regular duster - we promise. Also, don't forget about the window sills. Use cold tap water instead of hot whenever you cook. Wash your hands. Just, like, always. But seriously, wash them after you do things outside and every time before you eat. Wash stuffed animals or pillows if you can.

While they might have stressed washing to avoid the spread of germs, that's only one of the many reasons you should always wash your hands (and get your kids used to religiously wash their hands too). Washing your hands properly - meaning two rounds worth of the Happy Birthday song - with soap and water not only kills any germs that you may have touched, but also helps remove other nasties like bits of dirt, flecks of flame retardants, and specks of dust. Check out our website for a roundup of great non-toxic hand soaps.
So, no matter how annoying it may seem, keep washing those hands and wrangling the kiddos to do the same. .
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#becausehealth #globalhandwashingday#globalhandwashingday2018 #handwashing#washyourhands #soapandwater #dirt#germs #elmo @sesameraya #sesamestreet@unicef #nontoxic #flameretardant#flameretardantfree #myparentswereright#happybirthday #happybirthdaysong

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But, before you start going around disinfecting everything and hunting down all the antibacterial soap you can find, hear us out. Antibacterial soap isn't actually any better at killing germs than regular soap and water. In fact, the FDA has told companies to take the ingredient (triclosan) that often makes items antibacterial out of products. Instead of making us healthier, it can actually lead to superbugs that are stronger and more resistant to antibiotics - which could mean when we do get sick it's worse. So, this cold and flu season, stick to the regular soap and water - and don't forget to actually wash your hands. .

No matter what you've been doing (scrolling on your phone, writing a work email, taking the train, playing with your kid) it's probably just good advice. Not only does it remove germs, but it washes any toxic chemicals like flame retardants and heavy metal dust down the drain. And, to make sure that you aren't just replacing those toxic chemicals with others like phthalates and triclosan, pick up one of these reviewed, safe, and healthy hand soaps.

We know, hearing you should clean more often kind of sucks, but the benefits of fewer chemicals that cause problems like infertility and cancer in your body (and your kid's body) might be worth it. Try wiping down surfaces with a wet microfiber cloth, it's easier than actually dusting everything and makes a huge difference. Also, microfiber cloths are like magic dust magnets - gross but also cool. For more easy, #nontoxic cleaning tips, check out our site.
We know it feels like you have to be productive all day, but electronics like computers, keyboards, and tv's are often covered in flame retardants so they don't overheat and catch fire. But, it also means we are touching computers covered in chemicals then eating food and accidentally getting those chemicals in our mouths. So, wash your hands, and take a few minutes away from your computer to eat your lunch. You might even feel more refreshed after lunch or meet someone new.
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