Life

Do You Really Need that New Raincoat?

It sounds good and the price is right, but the chemicals might not be

Little sucks more than being caught in the rain. So, why are we suggesting you hold off on getting a new raincoat? The answer may surprise you. It has to do with what makes the coat itself waterproof. Often for coats to be impervious to water the outer layer is covered in a chemical that belongs to a family of chemicals we at Because Health affectionately call pretty freaking awful stuff - the technical term is PFAS.

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Food

How to Get the Most Nutritious Bang for your Buck AND Fight Climate Change

Climate change is messing with your food. Here's how you can bite back.

Ugh. We're just gonna say it - Climate change sucks. It's messing with the weather, it's messing with our allergies, and now… our food too?!

All of that extra CO2 we're putting into the air is making plants grow really fast and forcing them to turn that carbon into sugary carbs and fibers instead of healthy vitamins and minerals. While a little bit of extra CO2 can help plants grow faster, too much zaps the nutrients out of healthy leafy greens, high protein rice, and vitamin-packed fruits. How? Plants need time to grow and build up healthy minerals and nutrients.

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With Memorial Day in our rearview mirrors, it officially means it's time to break out the BBQ. While that may mean more time at the beach, or in the park, you might have noticed it's been heating up for a few weeks already. Hate to break it to you, but more summer isn't necessarily a good thing - - thanks, climate change! In fact, since scientists first started recording summer temperatures in 1895, the planet has heated up almost 1.5 degrees °F. This may not sound like much, but if you were running a fever of 100 degrees (as opposed to your normal 98.6), you would be concerned about your health. It's the same for the planet. Most of the warming has occurred in the last 50 years, and, 2017 marked the third hottest year on record with more frequent and longer heat waves, plus increased humidity. New parts of the United States that have never seen spurts of crazy temperatures before are feeling the heat - think Portland, summer 2017 that hit temps in the triple digits. Scientists are even predicting Boston could feel more like Florida by the end of the century! Florida is great sometimes, but New Englanders still love their white winters.

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